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tv   U.S. Senate  CSPAN  August 6, 2012 8:30am-12:00pm EDT

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three steps in that. one is to create a steering committee of industry leaders, ceos and the equivalent in the companies, to start to help to move this strategy forward in a way that is practical to them. second is the idea of doing some immediate sharing in two federal bands and, in fact, the fcc is working now on rulemaking for the 3550. that's one of the bands that we talked about, choosing another band. and we think that could be done with existing white space technology. and that's something that could be started almost immediately after the regulatory process goes through. the third is we look at creating a testy and mobile test -- test city which will give solace to industry, to the federal agencies and also to policymakers that this whole sharing concepts can be practically done and also that they can get some solace that
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they've been tested oaf a long -- over a long period of time in a very large environment. in terms of what can be done in the three years, we certainly feel we can start to get the early spectrum access systems up, and we believe that we also can start to look at receiver protection limits that will make this all feasible. and i know you've talked about that, paul, in previous interviews that you've done. and so when you put all that together with small cell technology, it says that you can actually get started in these bands and have something up and running in the next three years. >> host: and we are out of time -- >> guest: i'll just offer. >> host: very quickly, mr. mundie. >> guest: i was just going to say, you know, i think when we've seen other changes like this, when people got excited about wi-fi and blue tooth, you saw this incredibly rapid evolution of these technologies. if the president signs this and the spectrum starts to become available, i think we'll see, you know, very rapid adaptation
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of even things like the lte system that the carriers are now, you know, basically deploying modified. it already starts with the idea that today want to aggregate, you know, frequencies within these bands incrementally given to them, but they're all different around the world. so they're already building an architecture that has this flexibility, they just haven't made the final leap to realize they should be able to aggregate those carriers into these sharing bands dynamically, and i predict myself that you'll see that happen over the next few years if this gets done. >> host: and craig mundie and mark gorenberg are members of the president's council of advisers on science and technology. we've been talking to them about their report, realizing the full potential of government-held spectrum to spur economic growth. thank you, gentlemen, for joining us from redmond, washington, the microsoft studios. paul kirby, "telecommunications reports," thank you as well. >> host: thank you. >> later this morning the national business group releases
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its survey on the effect of the health care law on large businesses. it examines several factors including how companies are adjusting their benefit plans. the group's president and ceo will announce the findings at the national press club live at 10 a.m. eastern over on c-span. and later at booktv.org, a live webcast with "wall street journal" economics editor and pulitzer prize recipient david wessel. he'll discuss his new book, "red ink," which details where the trillions of dollars that make up our federal budget come from and where all the money goes. you can see his remarks from the politics & prose bookstore in washington, d.c. at 7 p.m. eastern at booktv.org. >> in the weeks ahead, the political parties are holding their platform hearings in advance of the summer conventions with democrats voting this weekend on their final platform recommendations in detroit. later this month republicans start their platform process at
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their tampa convention site. c-span's coverage of the party conventions begins august 10th with the reform party in philadelphia followed by live gavel-to-gavel coverage of the republican national convention beginning monou august 27th, from tampa, and the democratic convention from charlotte, north carolina, starting monday, september 3rd. you're watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs, weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events, and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> and live now to the nation's capital where the department of education is about to kick off an all-day conference on bullying prevention efforts. among the speakers, health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius and maryland
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first lady katie o'malley. >> good morning, everyone. how y'all doing? good. welcome, welcome to washington d.c. welcome to our third annual summit. this is great. my name is michael, i am the deputy assistant secretary for the office of elementary and secondary education at the department. the mission of my office, the office of elementary and secondary education s to promote academic excellence and insure equitable opportunities for educationally-disadvantaged kids. and we have a number of great efforts and programs to sport this mission. race to the top early learning challenge which provides kids with a great opportunity to start off right, particularly high-needs kids, give them access to high quality early learning programs. we have our title i program which provides resources to support low income kids, make sure they have the support and the services necessary to succeed. we have grants to improve teacher effectiveness, we have
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programs to turn around our lowest performing schools, english language acquisition services, after school extended learning time, we have secondary programs that are geared to insure that kids have access to rigorous, high quality programs like ap or ib, dropout prevention programs. and ultimately, ultimately, our vision of success, our vision of success is to make sure that all kids are on track to graduate from high school college and career ready. but i've got to tell you as everyone in this room knows, we are not going to be successful in our efforts, we are not going to be successful to make sure that all kids are on track to graduate from high school college and career ready if a child is not safe or a child doesn't feel safe. and we're not just talking physical harm, we're talking emotional harm. a child cannot learn if he -- or
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thrive, if he or she is in a culture of fear or disrespect. so we know that kids can't achieve their full potential if they do not feel safe. and we often, too often, understand there are some very serious and tragic consequences as well. so the best way to address bullying is to prevent bullying. i am so excited about this opportunity these next couple days to learn from you guys. we can learn from each other. this is a really, really good opportunity. thank you, thank you for being here, for taking the time out of your busy schedules to be here with us. at point i'm going to turn it over to my colleague, dr. deborah themkin, and she's going to kick us off. thanks. deborah? [applause] ♪
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>> good morning, everyone. >> morning! >> so many of you have joined us in the past for our first two summits in 2010 and 2011, and i'm so pleased to see so many new faces in the room, including a huge group of youth. the first thing i'm going to do is ask you if you are under the age of 22, i want to hear from you. [laughter] throughout this summit i know some of them are arriving a little late, we're going to have about 30 youth in the room. that's huge. because we know that this issue is not one that's affecting us as adults, it's one that's happening every day to kids. and we can't do anything about this problem if we're not listening to the kids involved. so we're pleased to have you. thank you so much for being here. but what is our purpose for being here today? you know, we've had three of these. this is our third summit this year. what are we doing here?
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we're learning the best available research, and we're learning to collaborate with each other. we want to make sure that in all of our collective efforts in this very important problem, we're not repeating what each other's doing, and we're actually furthering prevention efforts. now, i want to say a special welcome to those who are joining us via live stream and remind you at home that you are welcome to participate with us via twitter and facebook using hashtag bullying summit. now, it is my great pleasure to welcome the special assistant to the president for education. now, roberto rodriguez has a number of great achievements starting at la raza and going to the senate help committee where he worked with senator kennedy. he is now the white house's lead
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on education, and i first got to meet him when we started discussing the white house conference that was held in march 2011. he is one of the sweetest and most generous guys i've ever known and one of the most brilliant minds that i have ever had the privilege to interact with. so with that, i'm pleased to welcome roberto rodriguez. [applause] ♪ >> well, good morning, everyone. >> morning. >> t my pleasure to welcome you to the third annual federal partners in bullying prevention summit. and i want to start today's conference by giving a very warm thanks to our administration's leaders on this important issue across our federal government from the departments of education, justice, health and human services and all of our
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other federal partners. many hours of time and effort were invested to bring us all togetant h work, and we're grateful done e week's summit a reality. i'd like to ask you to join me in an applause for all of our federal staff who have worked on this issue. [applause] as in years past, we come together again this morning with a familiar and common purpose. we come together unified by the same shared belief which is to bring light to the problem of bullying in our schools and in our communities and to make the unequivocal statement that bullying for any reason is unacceptable. just last march president obama and the first lady gathered students, parents, community leaders and national experts from around the country at the white house to issue a national call to stop bullying and to
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dispel the destructive myth that bullying is just a harmful rite of passage or an inevitable part of growing up. it is not. and at that convening we heard about the devastating effects of bullying. we learned about some tragic experiences and circumstances that dashed the dreams and the lives of young people. but we also heard stories of great courage, and we were inspired by young people who were taking a stand and taking action in their schools, in their neighborhoods, online and with their peers to stop bullying. today brought new ideas -- they brought new ideas and new solutions to confront this problem head on. and most importantly, nay demonstrated a zeal and a determination to make a difference. many of you in this room share that spirit and that determination, and we want to celebrate that spirit during this week's convening. because our administration shares it too.
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and with that we also want to explore new ways to work together to stop bullying now. we still have a long way to go. this past year alone almost three million students have reported that they've been bullied, pushed or shoved on the play ground or on the way to school, tripped in the hallway, even spit on. during the school year, about a third of middle school and high school students report being bullied. and as we all know, this behavior isn't just contained to our classrooms and to our schoolyards. it can follow children from thel phones to their computer screens. we all pay the price for this. from absences during the school year to poor performances in the classroom and other more far-reaching effects. any way that you look at this, our children suffer when bullying occurs. now, i still consider myself a relatively new parent.
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i have two children, 4 and 6, at home. and one thing you learn a as a parent particularly as your children start school is that their journey to adolescence and, ultimately, to adulthood will be challenging regardless of the circumstances. growing up can be a time for thoughtful introspection. when you come into your own, you begin to feel comfortable in your own skin, and at the same time growing up can produce insecurity. insecurity that either is exacerbated or diffused by a child's surroundings, by their peers, by their school, by the neighborhood in which they live. we've all been there. we've experienced this transition in our own lives with all of its highs and lows. as a parent, i've already started to watch my children experience life, already filled with a few moments of downfall and of uprising. and as they grow up, there'll be
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moments of hope, and there'll be some moments of disappointment in their lives. but as apartments we all -- as parents, we all want to provide space for them and make sure that they're able to make their own decisions, to learn from those decisions along the way. but there is one area where there is no paradox and no gray area. above all things we wan our children to be -- we want our children to be safe. that responsibility to provide a safe environment for our children starts at birth. it's instilled in all of us as parents. and when a child is bullied, we have failed that duty. we can't place the blame on my one individual for how that bullying came to be, but we must all know, and we must all remind ourselves that we've had a role in preventing it from happening. as parents, as teachers, as community members, as caring adults, we must all be proactive to make sure that we stop
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bullying before it starts. and it's from those instincts that president obama has placed such an emphasis on bullying prevention and used his position as our president and as a parent to provide leadership to stop bullying when we see it and before it starts. when we fall short of keeping our kids safe and free from bullying, the president reacts as any parent would. what if that had been my child? we've seen too many lives damaged and too many children suffer from the words and actions of bullies. no children -- no child should be made to feel unsafe and alone. as the president has said, we've got to make sure that our young people know that if they're in trouble, there are caring adults and young adults who can help. if they're having a tough time, we've got to let them know that they're going to get through it and that there's a whole world
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of possibility that's waiting for them. a commitment to insuring the safety of our children has been the central tenet of our administration's broad-based effort to prevent bullying. six cabinet agencies -- departments of agriculture, defense, education, health and human services, interior and justice -- along with more than 80 federal and external partners nationwide are collaborating to help prevent bullying, to keep young people safe and to create a climate in our schools, in our commitments -- in our communities that support all young people. our administration has been aggressive in our efforts to identify the problem and to address it, and we have several milestones that we have to show for it. we've launched stopbullying.gov, a one-stop, integrated resource for children, parents, teachers and community members to identify bullying and to find ways to end it. we've improved data collection
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at the department of education to better understand the scope of the problem and the prevalence of bullying across our schools. at the same time, we've issued more effective policy guidance that's aimed at protecting students against harassment based on race, national origin, sex, gender and disability. we've taken new steps to urge governors and state school chiefs to establish and adopt comprehensive anti-bullying policies. we've launched robust advocacy campaigns through offices such as the department of justice's community relations service and through the department of health and human services health resources and substance abuse and mental health services administrations. to expand awareness of what bullying is and to provide the resources and tool kits to prevent it. and, of course, we're all joining together to host this week's summit to further explore how this issue impacts our
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families and our communities and to chart steps for future success. so i want to be sure that i do two things before i conclude this morning. the first is to thank each and every one of you for your presence here today. our administration is grateful for your participation in this shared work and for everything that each of you has done and will continue to do to prevent and stop bullying. over the next two days, you'll hear from a number of our administration's officials from all of the departments that i mentioned who will go into greater detail about the initiatives and the goals that we have at the federal level. you'll also hear from our partners in the private and nonprofit sectors who are force multipliers in this effort. and that brings me to my second task which is to enlist your support and your partnership in moving forward. the programs that you'll hear about both inside and outside of
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the government are making great strides to stop bullying. our challenge is not necessarily to develop the new initiative or to reinvent the wheel, but rather to explore how we can work together and collaborate to expand the impact of the investments and efforts that are already underway across the country. we all share the same goal, and we can double down on our impact if we work together to achieve a new culture of respect in our schools and in our commitments. communities. a climate where all of our children feel safe and know they belong. this is the end toward which our collective work aspires. so i hope this summit will inspire a renewed commitment and an effort on this critical issue that will bring us forward and help urge us toward greater action. it's up to each of us to act against bullying. it's wrong, it's destructive,
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and it can be prevented. thank you so much. [applause] ♪ >> thank you so much, roberto. i think he deserves another round of applause. [applause] the commitment this white house has shown towards bullying prevention and making sure all kids are safe no matter the context is outstanding and unprecedented, and i want to thank roberto so much for his leadership in this area. um, with that, we're going to transition to our next panel. um, so it is my pleasure to welcome to the stage peggy conlin, the president and ceo of the ad council, and marlo thomas, the founder of the free to be foundation. just a little background, peggy conlin, as you'll see in your
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program books, joined the ad council in june 1999, and she serves as chief executive officer of an organization that mobilizes yearly more than $1.5 billion of advertising time and space. the creative services of over 50 advertising a agencies and related financial support from hundreds of corporations. i'm so excited for them to join us today to announce the launch of a psa contest that i've had the pleasure of working with over the last several months. with that, please, help me welcome peggy conlin and marlo thomas. [applause] ♪ >> thank you very much and good morning. this is not my first time at this podium. last year i attended the summit
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and spoke alongside panelists from facebook and time warner as well as a man named kevin jacobson. kevin's son cameron, a ninth grader from new york, had been a victim of bullying and, tragically, took his own life. as many of you know just seven months ago, we lost kevin too. he was an important advocate for bullying prevention, and like many of you, we were devastated by this news. we feel his loss deeply, and we're honored to continue his work. in a world where we're constantly hearing new i data and shocking statistics, it's important to keep in mind that bullying is an intensely personal issue and beautiful lives are lost as a result. we are all here today because bullying is one of the most pressing social issues facing our country. it has led to devastating con scwexes for our children -- consequences for our children, our families and our communities. i'm honored to be joined today
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by marlo thomas who we all know well. marlo is the founder and president of the free to be foundation, and she has been a champion for all children facing adversity throughout her life. together we will preview a new national multimedia public service campaign designed to empower parents to teach their children how to be more than a bystander. whether it's underage drinking or obesity prevention, we know that parents play a critical role in preparing their children for the challenges that they may encounter. the ad council's psa campaign, which will launch this october, will specifically target parents. this campaign is truly unprecedented in nature. this single crusade has brought together public, foundation, corporate and media support. our partners on this effort include aol, facebook, the free
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to be foundation, the waite institute for violence prevention, johnson & johnson, and the u.s. departments of education and health and human services. and our cause has been aided by pro bono resources from ddb, communispace and cara as well as generous media support from clear channel, aol, facebook and many others. we're delighted that some of our partners have joined us today, and i would like to take a moment to acknowledge them. over here we have joe and jenny, and also from cartoon network, alice khan. thank you so much for all that you're doing on this effort. and a very special thanks to deb temkin from the department of education for all her input and guidance and for organizing this terrific summit. [applause]
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the campaign was developed with help from a very engaged advisory group, many of whom are also here with us today, and we really appreciate your valuable feedback. nearly three out of four children in our country witness bullying. research has shown that parents don't see an inherent need to talk to their kids about bullying unless their child is involved in an incident or approaches them to talk about it. however, we all know bullying effects all children regardless of whether or not they've personally experienced it. while a vast majority of kids want to stop bullying, they are unsure of what to do. less than 20% of kids who say that they've witnessed acts of bullying have reported taking any action to stop it. i know what you're thinking, intervening during an act of bullying can be very scary for a child. our campaign will educate
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parents about how to be proactive in talking to their children about bullying and arm them with a list of low-risk alaskas that they can take as a bystander. actions like tell an adult, befriend the person being bullied and don't give bullying an audience. through a series of new tv, print and web ads as well as social media channels, we will not only get this on parents' radar, we will insure that they have the best tools to address bullying and prevent future tragedies. this is a very complex and multifaceted issue, but we're hopeful that our campaign will engage parents and help them understand their critical role in solving this problem. this just a moment -- in just a moment, we will preview the first psas on the campaign, but first i'd like to introduce to you the perfect example of how one person can 'em pair others for -- empower others for
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social good. i first got to know marlo thomas as anne marie in the sitcom, "that girl." she was a role model to me and most girls and young women in the '70s. today i remain in awe of her force of nature, particularly how she's continued her father's work on behalf of st. jude's hospital raising over $700 million every year for children with cancer. [applause] marlo is the president of free to be foundation, and she has worked for nearly 40 years to help children challenge stereotypes, fight discrimination and encourage individuality. it has been both a personal and professional privilege to work with marlo on our upcoming psa campaign, and i'm delighted to have her with me today. please welcome marlo thomas. >> thank you so much. [applause] thank you. thank you so much. i, um, i've also worked for aol
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and huffington post where i have my own web site, and i do quite a bit of blogging, and i've done about a dozen blogs on bullying. in fact, i heard from kevin jacobson. he reached out to me after reading a few of them and wanted to meet and talk, and i was heartbroken, as everyone else was, when he took his own life. it was quite a shock that he just finally just gave up hope on the anniversary of cameron's death and left his wife, wanda, and his other children really devastated. but it became apparent to me that, um, i needed to get even deeper involved, and that's why i brought in the free to be foundation. because it's the idea that we are targeting parents is so correct. we learn from our parents. my first lesson on bullying i learned from if my father. i'll never forget we were driving in the car. i was 8 years old. and there was some little boys
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beating up on another little boy. and my father stopped the car and jumped out of the car. and i was terrified. and i remember looking through the back window at what my father was doing. and he was shaking them and talking to them. he pulled them apart, and then he pulled the little boy that was being bullied into our car, and we took him home. after we took him home, my father was very upset, and he hit his hand on the steering wheel, and he said, i hate a bully. it really -- i remember it to this day. i can remember what i was wearing, what street it was. it was such an enormous effect, it had such an enormous effect on me. and i thought of that when i started hearing about targeting parents, because we learn so much, we learn everything from our parents either by example or by word. so getting parents to truly get involved, i think, is really the key to stopping this. ..
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absolutely trapped in this lives that they cannot stop. so it really is up to the parents to look for the signs of what looks like when a child is bully. their friends no longer call them come to not get invited to birthday parties, to become him crying, to do not want to go to school, did have some kind of strange stomach ache? they don't want to take the bus. these are all signs that this child is having a bad time at school. and also as a pair to be honest and face it if your child is the bully. so many parents are in denial
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that their child is doing this to other children, and that is a huge problem that we have to speak to those parents as well. and the last thing, or the third thing for me today, is to him still in your child that if you don't stand up for a child that is being bully, who will be there to stand up for you? this is how you grow. this is what they say and the bible, treat others as you wish to be treated, yes. stand up, or who will be there for you? i've been speaking to a lot of families since i started my whole campaign on aol and "huffington post," and i spoke to one mother who told me that she had no idea that her son was being bullied. and one day she got a phone call from a mother of one of his friends, a little boy's name was jack. one of jack's friends mother called her and said i just want you to know that my son came home crying today. the were nine or 10 years old. my son came home crying today
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because he just couldn't take it anymore watching his friend, jack, the bolded like this bigger kid. and she said today, jack was beating in the cafeteria, this bully kid came behind and smashing in the back and he choked, the little kid choked on his food, felt over. people helped him up, but it was a dangerous situation. so the mom went to jack and said if something happened in school today? and he said no. she said did you have some kind of fight or something? he said no. so she called the mother back and she said he said no. she said just a minute, let me put my son on, so little delegates on the phone and is crying and tells the mother, jack's mother would happen. so jack's mother goes back to jack. jack, i just spoke to billy, and this is what he told me. and jack cried and admitted that it had happened but he did when his mother to do anything, whatever. the mother did do something. she called the school, they call
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the parents of the bully, and the little boy that was the witness, and they went in the room at the school, and after the whole thing was done, with a little boy that was the victim crying and the little boy who was the witness crime, the boy that are done the bullying said that wasn't what happened. and the parents of the child who had bullied said they believed their child, that their child would never do any thing like that. anyway, kids always do things like this. there's an absolute disconnect for all of these people in this room, and his mother, i'm in touch with her, and she still is involved in it. now, thankfully this bully was picking on little jack has kind of slowed down his momentum because he is being watched now, but you can't even get them in the room and have it stopped. so you have to really, we have to really, really dig away at all the parents. the parents of the bystander, the parents of the bully, and the parents of a child who was
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the victim. it really is time for parents to take charge of this, and i'm thrilled to be a part of the ad council, which peggy has come and facebook and aol and white family foundation and the department of education and j&j, and the creators of the bullying movie, too, are a part of all this, all focused on all parents to realize that this issue impacts all children. the resource for the campaign is of course stopbullying.gov, and what i try to do is focus on the human side by talking to the parents, talking to the children. i spoke to children, spoke to dozens of parents but also spoke to a 15 girl whose dozens -- whose younger sister was around nine years old, and she of course it's bullied. this older sister is trying very hard to pave the way for little sister to stop being victimized. and one of the things that she has done with her and her
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friends at 15, she was doing this for a couple of years, is they have gotten together to do this smile and hug program. and when they see a kid who is by themselves, a little girl maybe, girl, so the focus on the girls. a little girl is shunned and being eaten alone. -- and is eating alone. they want to make sure no one feels alone. when it walked on all and they see somebody looking sad or something, they smile and hug. they are doing in their own way what we're trying to get parents to do, is to acknowledge, to see it, to bring some warmth and light to it. and i was just so touched by this little girl named john. you know, i had a great deal of my life since my father's death, 21 years ago to raising money for saint jude research hospital. i spent a great deal of time there, and i see these children, how compassionate they are. little four and five year olds hugging little three year olds who are losing their hair and
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not feeling well, feeling nauseous from their chemotherapy. they are so compassionate to each other, and a look at them and i think what is that? that compassion that is there, why can't we put that compassion and children who are not sick? children were able-bodied. what is this, this necessity to hurt other children? i look at maybe country in the children of children in saint jude and i see such passion, such love and such capacity for joy and such adversity. and i think we have to find a way. it's in all of us. it's in all the children. to find a way to bring the goodness out of the children. while we're talking to the parents, the parents need to find way to bring the goodness out of their children, too. you can't just school children. also have to bring up the goodness. i went, i do a lot of interviews on my website. i any good kelly ripa last week, a mom of three kids, and they go
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to a school. she said she looked for school because she was very worried about her children. their mexican-american. their mom is famous to the regis toomey ways in which they could be taunted. and she found a school that had a zero-tolerance. zero-tolerance for bullying. and she said one little boy called another boy gay, and he was expelled. and i'll tell you something, you can have all the government committees that you want, and you can have all of this wonderful organizations, we can raise all the money we want, but if we don't start having a zero-tolerance in school, this is going to go on and on and on. i truly believe that if some child is cruel to another child, they should be expelled. the end of it. you got to stop it. you've got to pull those children out of the schools, because i don't know, you know, how else are you going to prevent? there are other ways i'm sure but i would like us to start thinking about zero-tolerance. i do know that in my work with
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children, with st. jude, and with children around the country, speaking to them and helping them through a lot of bully situations, it needs all of our energy. i hope next year when we come to this event we can look at each other and say look a much we have accomplished this year. look at how much pain we have stopped. i hope that we can do that, and i wish you luck, and god bless you on your way. [applause] >> you see how lucky we are to have marlo in our camp on this? thank you so much for your partnership, marlo. and she's really incredible no matter what form she has. she always manages to work in the bullying campaign and enlists only people to help us with this effort. and i understand there's supposed to be a clicker to advance the work up here.
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i haven't seen it though. if you guys in the back want to advance, that's okay, too. oh, it felt? -- foul? i see it. thank you. i was going to get down -- thank you. and now what we've been waiting for, the psa is that you're about to see have been developed pro bono by a very talented team from new york-based ad agency, ddb, who i mentioned earlier, and without further ado, let's take a look at our new tv spot. >> don't look at me. >> pick that up. >> you are such a dork. here, let me help you with that. >> every day, kids witness bullying. they want to help but don't know how.
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>> no one here is going to help you. >> show kids how to be more than a bystander. >> isn't that great? [applause] >> of course our campaign is more than television spots, and i like to take a second to give you a quick look at some of the print ads and online presence. here's the print. for those of you who can't read it, the first one says, you're worthless. you don't see bullying like this every day. you're kids do. teach your kids have to be more than a bystander. learn how to stop bullying .co. and the second, everybody hates you. you don't see bullying like this every day. you're kids do. teach your kids how to be more than a bystander. learn how at stop bullying.gov. we're developing web banners that have a similar look and feel to the print ads. as you can see, each of our
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campaign components will direct parents to stop bullying.gov. the site provides parents with engaging and interactive resources, including the ability to click on each of the bystander tips to receive more information. each tip will include video content from experts, kids, and parents. i'd like to leave you all with one more powerful psa greater with lee hirsch is remarkable footage from his acclaimed documentary. is real footage from the firm bully is courtesy of the only project and the weinstein company, and we're grateful for their collaboration, and i'm so glad that sarah from the only project to join us here today.
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>> no, no, no. >> every day, kids witness bullying. they want to help. how? teacher kids have to be more than a bystander. visit stopbullying.gov. >> what lee manages to capture on camera is a poignant reminder of the importance of equipping our children more than just bystanders. before we take questions for a minute or two i'd like to just say once again, that none of this would be possible without the tremendous support of our extraordinary partners. this is an unprecedented event. where so many have come for to provide corporate and media support, nonprofit leadership, and government resources to take on such a critical issue. i know it will have impact. for those of you who have already done so much to fight bullying, we thank you. we are proud of what has already
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been accomplished and we are excited as we look towards our october launch. i'd like to open up the discussion to questions from the audience. if we have any. i can't quite see. yes. to the microphone. there's nobody there. >> good morning. my name is bonnie, and i work with teenagers, maybe you don't know that group of people. i have another group that it work with that we really need help with. i work with the education association, and there are teachers going into classrooms who have had no training. now, we have a toolkit and some of you have things, too, but how do we get that information to the teachers, to the universities, to the colleges
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and community colleges? >> so, as a sneak peek is something you hear about tomorrow, the department of education through our safe and supportive technical assistance center is excited to announce a module for classroom teacher training, and i'm looking over here at kentucky and sandy from our assistance center to a our our, and so you'll hear more about that later. we agree that teacher training is a very important aspect and we do want to provide use those tools. >> hello. i'm from the university of virginia. i wanted to raise some concern about the suggestion that we use expulsion and zero-tolerance for bullying. [applause] >> as you may know the american psychological association had a task force that studied
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intensively the policy of zero-tolerance that has swept around the country, and found primarily negative effects and no evidence that zero-tolerance was an effective policy that kept schools safer. they also found that it tends to be in a highly discriminatory manner, but long-term suspension policies are disproportionately applied to minority students, and drive up our rates. that are more effective alternatives to zero-tolerance in dealing with bullying, and i would hope that we would bring, bring together some of the research, support for those alternative approaches. >> again, you are previewing what will have later in the agenda. tomorrow, we'll have a panel on supporting bullying which looks at the affects bullying has all the kids were doing the bullying, and also ways we can help support them. >> if i could just jump in on that as well. i mean, i think it is, there's an imperative here though that we have our schools and our states really a top comprehensive policies that are
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research-based, that hold themselves accountable for bullying, and we do more to really make sure we are identifying those policies that work best. i begin, i want to just commend our federal partners and the department of education for really documenting statewide state-by-state looking at what those policies and practices are at the state level, and doing more to really disseminate that so we get are research-based policies in place. that's just got to be a huge goal for us. >> hi, i'm from the university of illinois, urbana-champaign. i wonder with the research showing a connection between exposure to family violence and holy perpetration how would you reach those parents that may not go to your website to learn bystander intervention because the very behavior we're seeing in their children stem from their own violence within their home?
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>> i think that might've been a question regarding the communications program so i will take a stab at the. i think what we see in creating social change is that it's not anyone message. i think that we execute across a variety of platforms, and hopefully over time change the norm about what's acceptable and what's not acceptable. there's so many different ways to create a conversation and a dialogue. and people, you have to see that. you cede that to a mass media, you see that through social media and eventually hope it also becomes word-of-mouth. we are really factoring in on it from every angle. >> hi. my name is jonathan cowen and i'm from the national school climate center and also teachers college columbia university, and i wanted to say two things. first, thank you. i think it's extraordinary that the government and the ad
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council are coming together and really explicitly appreciating the bullying is never an individual act. and that focusing simple on cash et cetera punishment is unhelpful. you are really highlighting the role of the witness is a tremendous contribution. my second thought though is that in addition to parenting -- as you the organizers of this conference are explicitly saying, students are also teaching agents, and we can and i would suggest we need to support students being outstanding ambassadors, students learning in detail about what does it mean to be socially responsible. and you can support, we can all support students and parents, teachers who need to be integral partners thinking and struggling in the best sense of the work together about what does that mean to be socially responsible, how can we be end up standard
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rather than a bystander, and the a standard alliance that you can find on the website has a series of ideas to support that. >> can i just remarked to that, you know, i had the opportunity preview movie bully before came out, and at this as a windows it's an currently powerful movie, and then i saw a link to a picture on please facebook page, i think is on his facebook page. they were premiered the movie of the kodak theatre in los angeles and there were nearly 1000 kids in this audience, as panoramic view and i thought my goodness, these kids are going to see this movie and that is what's going to change the future. >> hi. i serve on the presidents advisory commission for asian-americans and pacific islanders. i just want to add to the comments of the previous comments about the outstanding work that these transitions are
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represented -- that these psas represent the they are real powerful images to my question really is about there are plans to have those ads and other languages, in spanish and perhaps eventually patiently which is as well. >> that's a terrific observation. we do translate ad council campaigns cup an actual we do more than that. we do primary research and minority populations, hispanic, african-american, to understand the cultural references and get the language just right. it's really a matter of funding because we have to reimburse our partners for their out of pocket, even though all of this is done pro bono. but that is definitely in the plans for the campaign, and would help this campaign will thrive and survive for years and that there will be many generations of it, so thanks for your support. >> hi. good morning, my name is helen, i'm from asian fabric and united in philadelphia.
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i had two questions. one was, i really appreciate the president's, presidents administration focusing bullying, moving it from an individual relationship-based kind of situation to recognizing the institutional -- the impact it has with schools in particular and having justice department and education department working specifically on institutional issue. my question is about the centers for disease, the cdc's definition of bullying, which has been sort of a problem in at least in philadelphia in terms of understand how institutions respond. the definition talks about how bullying is a relationship based experience over time in which one person is physically larger, stronger, mentally quicker, or socially more powerful than the other. and the concern has been that it locates blame within the victim and doesn't help seek out a solution for the entire
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situation and offer teachers, administrators, community people, you know, proper solutions. so i was wondering if you could maybe talk about how we can -- i'm not denying the cdc's definition because i understand that psychologically based and that is based on behavioral health, mental health. but what i think when it shifts to an institutional setting it does have, there may be a different way of looking at bullying. >> so, the cdc definition has not yet been fully released yet. it is pending release. probably by the end of this year but knowing government, we can never be too precise when it will come out. but it should be out in the next several months. the point to really clarify about the purpose of the cdc definition is that it is a research definition. more work is going to be needed to be done in order to translate that into a policy definition. and on very precise distinctions
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between a policy definition and research definition. but in order to get to that policy definition, we need to have some sort of consensus in the literature. because right now we go and look into the literature of what the antecedents of bullying might be to develop our prevention strategies, people are faring in their definitions there. so it's hard for us to develop a comprehensive understanding of risk and protective factors when we don't have a definition even in the research. so i think is a very important place for us to start, and we definitely need to have more of those conversations about how it is translated to policy. >> good morning. i am with the national association of secondary school principals. i'm here perfectly to thank you for being partners in this situation. i think it's very common for public school education to get thrown under the bus every time there's a problem, and we are
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ready and willing to be part of the solution and not part of the problem. and so my question is to you, school starts monday morning. we are ready. the doors are opening. kids are walking in. could you give us some indication of timelines so that we as the leaders in our schools can support our students and communities in your efforts? >> do you mean timelines for the campaign? >> for the campaign, yes, ma'am. >> yes, we will be rolling of the campaign in october. it will appear, and, of course, all media platforms as i mentioned earlier, and we see this as a multimedia campaign. we want to be pushing it out to all of the constituent year, particularly on the web. so we hope to engage you to all of the various organizations that are represented here today. by that will start in october, i
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think that what i mentioned earlier to the gentlemen that asked about the hispanic language execution, this is a long-term effort. we are going to be there with you for years to come, and just as we have with issues like seatbelts and drunk driving and a variety of other social issues that we know communications can help change the norm, that's really our long-term objective. and thanks for your role in advance of helping to push it out. >> i just want to also add to that, and also applaud you for being here, and thank you for committing our principles to this work. our principles are such an important part of the solution here. not only are they instructional leaders, but they are the plays to go to make sure that a building is safe, that a culture is conducive to social and emotional development for kids, and to make sure that everybody
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feels included and belongs in a school. they create that climate, so we can't get there without our principals leadership, really and identifying bullying as a key priority in stopping that. and doing more throughout the year to address the challenge with their staff. >> and i'll point out one more thing, that the tip around bystander intervention will be live on stopbullying.gov very soon. the full of attractive model that you see a launch in october along with rest of the campaign but you got a sneak peek online now along with other updates along with a brand-new kids i. if you haven't been to stopbullying.gov for a while, go back. you are all sorts of new updates there. spent good morning. i am with bully police he was a. i lost my senate 2002 the bully side, so i've been kind of the grassroots level for the last 10 years and i want to say this is
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important and it's just a huge thing for me to kind of be here. i've been a teacher, and thanks, deb, for putting such a conflict is together. it will take a community. this is a community activity since day one when first started talking about this in 2003, was basically laughed at by people. so we've come a come a long way and i think we do have to embody those students and empower them. they are the key. we have to move them forward, and i've seen great things. i think it's great and tremendous that we're focusing now on the parents and getting the information to the stairs because sometimes they have been locked out by schools. so also the department of education, indeed need to push schools to make sure they getting information to those parents because everyone has to do this. i know we have brought law enforcement into this as well. this makes school and talked is going to bring law enforcement and to the fold. so it's a great thing, and i
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think the ad campaign is great, and do you have any plans to do some at campaign to encourage participation by students across the united states? you said something about a campaign of a contest for students, get them physically involved. because when they do become involved, things change rapidly. so thank you for everyone who is here. >> stay tuned. thank you so much. i would just add that these sort of issues when we take them on, particularly in working with partners like people in this room today, we find the next generation, the next generation, the next population. so i'm sure that at some point in time to will be a specific effort toward students, but we think that the most fertile area right now is to reach them through the parents. >> unfortnuately, we deem -- we do need to move onto next bill. i see you have a question but perhaps we can ask it of our next panel. great. thank you so much. we are just going to take a moment or two to transfer into
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the next panel. [applause] .. [inaudible conversations] ♪ ♪
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♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> and once again we are live here in the nation's capital for an all-day summit hosted by the department of education on bullying prevention efforts.
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little bit later we expect to hear from health and human services sec prayer -- secretary kathleen sebelius. up next there will be a panel on the year in review, where we've been and where we're going in bullying prevention, and this is daylong live coverage here on c-span2. ♪ ♪ [inaudible conversations]
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[inaudible conversations] >> a short break here in this daylong conference on bullying prevention hosted by the education department. we expect more comments, actually, comments from health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius and maryland's first lady, katie o'malley, in just a few moments. members of this panel are going to talk about the year in review, where we've been, where we're going, and we expect to hear from the department of education participant deborah temkin who you heard from earlier today.
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>> so part of our role here this year is to think about the actions that have happened over the course of the year that have made an impact on bullying prevention. and i'm so happy to welcome an amazing panel representing some of the major news items, advocacy, etc., around bullying this year. and their role is to tell you a little bit about what's happened, but also to think a little bit about where we go from here. so i'm just going to briefly introduce our panelists and let them have their time. sarah fowdy, lee hirsh's movie which i'm sure a lot of you have seen and we featured last year as well. alice khan is the cartoon network's vice president of social responsibility, and she is in charge of the stop bullying, speak up campaign. david washington, among many other accomplishments, um, is the man behind the scenes for the born this way foundation,
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lady gaga's kindness initiative. julie hertz ogg is the director of the national bullying prevention center and leads the organization of kids against bullying and pacer teens against bullying. and robert kim is my colleague at the department of education in the office for civil rights who will talk a little bit about some of the enforcement cases that ocr has dope in the past year. -- has done in the past year. please help me welcome to panelists -- welcome the panelists. [applause] it looks like we have alice's presentation queued up, so, alice, you're up. >> there you go. well, thanks very much. there's no way to turn those lights down, i feel like -- [laughter] so deb asked us to talk a little bit about the accomplishments of the past year, um, and then also next steps as we look ahead to the 2012-2013 school year and, um, and beyond. work on stop bullying, speak up, so can i get the slide up?
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i'd much rather look at the slide than me. ah, thank you very much. [laughter] work on stop bullying, speak up began in 2008 when our audience told us, and our audience is as young as 6 to about 13 except for tom and yer ri which is as young as 3 and as old as 83. [laughter] and what kids said to us is that of all the issues that worried them -- and there were a lot, my parents are out of work, is the war coming to my town, i hate getting picked last in gym -- the one thing they told us was that with bullying, especially when they saw their friends get picked on, that was the thing that really bothered them and the thing they thought they could change if somebody could just show them how. here we go. so our campaign focuses on empowering youth and adults to be active bystanders. as i said, we serve youth in the sort of 6-13 age range, and with the help of a truly stellar
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advisory board, we built an educational campaign on an entertainment network. we lost some names on that slide. but i'm sure you recognize the faces. we couldn't have done it without the folks pictured on this slide. in addition, a very special thanks to robin glass from project change who, as deb pointed out earlier, helped bring youth to the table, really terrific youth advisers as well. and our thanks to deb temkin who's joined us z an adviser this year. what kids told us was, um, don't tell us what to do, show us what to do. so our first video shorts did just that. they modeled the active bystander behavior so kids could watch other kids react in certain situations. in follow-up edge evaluating the efficacy of the message, we heard while young people appreciated the advice -- and
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this is why i'm so glad the ad council is talking to parents and adults -- you know, we modeled what our advisers helped us understand one of the best, safest things young people can do to be active bystanders is to tell a trusted adult. kids said, well, i did that, but the adult didn't do anything. so now what do i do? so we went back to scripting, and in addition our advisers counseled us to add information about how active bystanders could reach out to victims after a bullying incident, and both of those findings were integrated into the second psa which i hope will play now. what do you think i do now? is there some tech help? somewhere? no. okay. um, i'll move on. so in addition to to the video short that you're not seeing -- [laughter] um, let me share some
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information that we garnered recently from our audience of 6-12-year-olds. so we've been on the air since october of 2010. our campaign, along with work done with our partners and including the antidefamation league who i hope there's some reps here and glisten, we've been very present across multiple screens except, of course, this one. [laughter] and, but we all know kids sitting in this room. repetition is a crucial part of learning, and that's as true for preschoolers as it is for 6-11-year-olds and on up. but for the parents in this room, we also know when you say the same things over and over again, it's kind of like me telling my kids to clear the table and do their laundry, we fear it becomes almost white noise. what we've learned is that i'm way ahead of another slide. but in the research we heard spring, we heard kids say the following things. can i go back one?
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yes! um, young people and parents alike see bullying as a key issue impacting young people's lives. kids and parents are interested in a variety of information about bullying prevention. and they're especially receptive to seeing that information in schools. and despite increased attention in school, on television, online, on mobile settings, um, there is till a need for easy-to-find, actionable information about bullying bevex. prevention. kids literally said to us, yeah, you've been telling me. i hear you, i'm starting to do it, but don't, don't stop putting it out there. keep putting this information across screens. so that was a key finding for us, and i hope it's helpful for others as well. in the other news this year as we look back, stop bullying, speak up is being adopted by cartoon network channels
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internationally. this spring we launched in mexico city and sao paulo, brazil, with planned launches in chile and argentina this year, and we're working with colleagues in canada, asia and europe on launches over the next two years. bullying, as the researchers in this room know better than i, is a global problem, and we hope that stop bullying, speak up can be part of a global solution. um, as with the ad council, facebook has been a tremendously helpful partner for us. here in the states and along with each of our international launches, um, and we've passed about a million likes a few months back, and we look forward to continuing to find responsible ways to work with facebook to meet parents, community members and students' needs. all right, let's see if this video plays. on march 18th with a taped introduction from president obama, cartoon networkty -- debuted our first-ever documentary. it featured kids talking about being bullied, being a bully and
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how they did and did not speak up when they saw bullying happen. um, i hope i'll be able to show you a clip now, but if i'm not, it is on the stop bullying, speak up.com web site. all the educational rights have been cleared, it's available for free download on the site, and i believe it's still up on itunes as a free download. you can also see it on youtube. is there anybody back there pushing buttons? no. it's a great doc, i'm sorry you're missing it. alice, we're working on it. >> yeah, i've heard that before. [laughter] all right, i'm moving on. um, partnerships are the name of the game in getting this information out. working with the american federation of teachers and the national education association, we've been able to provide free bullying prevention materials. it's all customizen. our post oars are up there. schools can put their own names on them, use the tip sheets to do parent meetings.
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we've worked with home school associations and parent/teacher associations. we also focus on directing educators and other community leaders to materials provided by the antidefamation league, glsen, a great comic strip maker called bit strips and many others. we also work directly with boys and girls' associations so that our materials are free and available in the 4,000 clubs across the country. um, let's talk about next steps. we'll continue to work with cnn and our other time warner and turner partners to reach out as well as reaching out on cartoon network to young people. we'll launch additional activities in the fall that you'll learn about later in this year. but this is a long-term commitment for our network. um, it's both heartening and sad to know how long many people in this room have been working on this issue.
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but i will tell you that from a youth broadcaster perspective, cartoon network and my boss, stu snyder, who's our president, are committed to staying with this topic. this is not something we're in for a couple of years and then out. this is a concern of our target audience. we serve a vulnerable audience, and we will continue to put this information out there. um, we're also working on long form content. it's great that we do video shorts, but it's been terrific working with writers and producers of some of our most popular shows m i know everyone in this room is a huge gumball fan. yeah, yeah? gumball was one of the first series. you know, you work with writers and producers, it takes about 18-24 months to produce an animated show, so change is a little slower than we would like, but it was terrific to see 4 of the first 13 episodes having bullying prevention themes woven in, and that continues with that series, and we continue to work with other
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producers. we'll continue to do video shorts. i think digital content is the next frontier for all of us. how do we give our kids time to practice in safe, anonymous, online spaces in the gaming world, in role-playing games so that they can practice the skills we want them to emulate in real life? that's a challenge for us as we go forward. and i think the other thing that i've heard from our advisers and from other folks that we've worked with -- >> [inaudible] >> one of the videos is up. just let me finish this one sentence, it's research. it's one thing to test engagement, it's one thing to test comprehension. we need to put research in place to test the efficacy of our messages and see how we can change them. so, katie, if i push something, will it work? >> we're going to do it. >> you're going to do it? >> we ask the questions no one else will and answer them with crazy -- [inaudible] >> we have a lot of fun. but what happens when the
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situation isn't fun at all or even dangerous? >> what do you mean? >> you know we speak up against bullies. now i'd like to try an experiment with the help of -- [inaudible] what would happen if this guy play add bully, and this one played the new kid? bullying is unpredictable, and depending how you react, you never know what kind of result you'll get. you know what i think is going to happen? he's going to give the new kid a really hard time. >> i think the new kid's going to fight back. >> wrong. that just makes things worse. new kid should just calmly walk away, find an adult or teacher and speak up, tell them what's going on. >> you've got it. now, let's say you're the bully, being a jerk to the new kid. what do you do? >> dude, just kidding. >> i think you also find an adult and speak up. >> what if he still doesn't listen? >> just a second -- >> whoa, dude! dude! >> keep speaking up until they do something or find an adult who will. and it wouldn't hurt you to say
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something to new kid. talking to a teach or or an adult can only help. if it doesn't work out at first, keep speaking up until an adult does help. together, we can all stop bullying. speak up. >> go to stop bullying: speak up.com to find out more. >> thanks, katie. [applause] so that psa and others, again, on the stop bullying: speak up web site, and just in closing, um, the key for us going forward is partnerships. we're in 99 million kids' homes every single day in the united states across multiple screens. while we've learned a lot about bullying prevention, and i think we know a lot about what kids want to know and who kids are, we're not the experts. our partners are the experts. so cartoon network sees itself as a portal. we look forward to continuing to work with our partners, directing schools and parents to resources that are available for
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them. and i'm hoping that this conference will introduce me to even more people we can work with. deb, thank you very much. >> thanks so much, alice. well, i skipped right over her at the beginning, and i'm so sorry. but sara's here representing one of, i think, the biggest news items around bullying this year, the bully movie. and what's exciting about, um, the bully movie is that it's not just the amazing, impactful film itself, but the action around it. and sara's going to talk a little bit about that action. >> hi, everybody. um, so, my name is sarah foudy, and i'm the campaign director for the bully project, and the bully project is the social action campaign, um, that was developed, um, alongside the film "bully," really aiming to use the film as a catalyst to make big change, um, and really we've set as our goal nothing short of working to change the national conversation about
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bullying, um, alongside all of you. so, um, you know, i was really excited to see the ad council's, the psa today using the bullying footage. i had, you know, back in new york i was shuttling footage across the city, but i hadn't actually seen the final yet, and it's really incredible to see it and i'm glad, you know, that partnership happened and that that ad, you know, that psa campaign will be happening. um, it was interesting to see the footage for me, i've been, um, in addition to being the campaign director for the bully project, i've been involved with "bully" really since the beginning. i actually, lee hirsh, the director, and i went to high school together. so i was there when he was being bullied. i'm sorry to say i was not the best upstander. so it's been wonderful for me to be a part of this, to be able to sort of, you know, make amends, if you will, and have a way to, you know, try to work in a
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different way, um, to move forward on the issue. it's, um, you know, during the production of the film close to the end i went out to the field, and i went house to house to talk to all of the parents of all the bullied kids and get their consent and their permission to let their kids be in the film. and one thing just from the conversation that was happening on the panel earlier, just to enter into that a little bit, one thing that was really interesting to me was that so many of the parents of the bullies, you know, some were really disconnected and were happy for their kid to be in a film, and even though i brought the footage to show what was going on, didn't really want to engage in it, were just happy to say, great, my kid's going to be in a movie. but a lot of the other parents wanted, you know, invited me into the house, and i sat down and talked with them about, you know, showed them the footage, showed them the clips.
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some of them cried. and, you know, the parents of the bullies, um, really talked about, um, you know, wishing that they had been called by the school and that they had had more of a role of being at the table, um, to try to do something earlier. um, and that darn straight their, you know, son or daughter was going to be their son in this case was going to be in the film as a way to make sure that their kid got the clear message that this was not acceptable. um, so, you know, just -- i'm going to talk just a little bit about the sort of the birth of bullying, you know, its launch onto the theatrical stage, then switch over and talk about what we're doing now. one thing that, you know, those of us on the bully project team here a lot -- hear a lot of from our colleagues in the film making world is what do you mean you're still working on "bully"?
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isn't it done? and the answer is a resounding, you know, absolutely not. there's, you know, a huge amount of momentum, and, you know, agenda items and things that we're doing over the course of the next, um, six months or so in particular and then ongoing that i'd love to share with all of you. um, so i, you know, i don't know that everybody in the room has seen it or has seen our trailer, seen the film or seen the trailer, but, you know, assuming many have, you know, we launched, we premiered at tribeca in 2010, and we were bought by the weinstein company opening night. and really with their, you know, the weinstein company has a phenomenal pr prowess, started our theatrical release in march, in the past march, and, you know, we were sort of heading the road of most documentary films where we were, you know,
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we had really good press, we'd had, you know, we'd had some amazing screenings, i think really thanks to deb, probably, with the department of education and, you know, had built some incredible partnerships even before we opened three yacht riically with stop bullying: speak up, with pacer, with, you know, aft, nea, with, you know, amazing organizations, pflag, you know, hrc. with lots and lots of different organizations who were working with us to help get the message out that the film was coming, um, and that kind of thing. but then right before, on the eve of the theatrical opening, the mpaa gave us an r rating. and said that the film, you know, shouldn't be seen, um, it wasn't appropriate for kids because there was the use of profanity. and, you know, it's like, i
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think, seven f-bombs in the film that are all, you know, out of the mouths of bullies to bullied kids, and it's all language that these kids are hearing every day, and the mpaa was saying this isn't acceptable for kids to hear. we agree. [laughter] kids shouldn't be hearing this, but they are hearing it every day. and, you know, so we were in the middle of figuring out how to respond, and we discovered that, um, katie butler, a 17-year-old from michigan, had, you know, while we were in the campaign office figuring out our next steps and how to react, she'd gone online and created a petition on change.org and really almost overnight it was within days, there were over half a million signatures of people out there, you know, a community of voices saying this is not okay, um, and, you know, it ended up meaning that "bully" was launched in a different way
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in the press, in the media. um, it was sort of a perfect storm, if you will, for us to, um, have a much larger national platform to have the conversation, um, about what's happening in schools and why it matters for people to see the film and why it matters for people to come out of seeing the film and do something. um, and so, um, as part of -- so we opened, you know, we were in the middle of the sort of wonderful political storm or media storm, rather, we also, um, took really advantage of that opportunity to, to find other ways into, um, conversation sort of in a more political sense. we ended up, we're really lucky, we ended up having a couple different screenings, um, on capitol hill. you know, the -- as we were having one of our screenings,
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president obama endorsed the safe schools improvement act and the student nondiscrimination act. we screened, um, at the ray bourne house and, you know, representative mike honda had just coordinated the bipartisan anti-bullying caucus. so, you know, and, you know, in the meantime we also, um, forged a, you know, a connection with mike huckabee and with the mormon church who's been, you know, very supportive and interested in using lessons from "bully" in their community. so we've been working as hard as we can to build as broad a base and a bipartisan support to, you know, with the aim of having, using the, you know, sort of the high profile of the film to create a forum for discussions
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and policymakers and educators who have real solutions and have real ideas about how to make a difference, um, to come together and have that be in, um, you know, sort of in the public eye. so, you know, it's been an incredible, it's been an incredible journey for those of us on the team and really a privilege to be a part of it, and, you know, the@sort of like -- it's sort of like "bully" has a life of its own, and we're just trying to make open as many doors to help push the conversation forward in as many directions as we can. so one of the things, you know, as we launched theatrically, we simultaneously launched what has really become the centerpiece of our campaign. and it's called one million kids, the one million kid initiative. and, you know, lee hirsh really from the very, very beginning, for him what was critical about
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this film and what went into the editing, um, decisions was that this was the voice of the bullied kids, that this was an opportunity for them to speak. um, and, you know, to work to create a film that would create as much empathy as possible from the audience. so what he has always wanted to do is, you know, he's really set a goal of having no less than a million kids around the country see the film, um, in supported settings. so we worked with one of our, one of our partners, facing history and ourselves, developed a curriculum that accompanies the film "bully." it's, you know, using the different situations in the film to have a discussion with kids, um, about the, you know, the situations that they've seen and how it could be different. um, and so our one million kids
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campaign we launch inside the spring and sort of when school closed, we went for, you know, hay yea us the over the summer. but over 126,000 kids and teachers, you know, from around the country went on one million kid field trips really where before the trip the teachers were trained using the facing history and ourselves curriculum. the kids and the teachers got on buses or got on the mta in new york city, and they went to the theater, and they watched the film together. and they went back to their schools, and they had discussions about what they saw, um, and, you know, used that opportunity to partner with the other bullying curriculum that may have already been in the school, um, you know, to have a real discussion with those kids about what was happening on the ground and to inspire those kids to take action and to become, you know, activists in their
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schools, to be upstanders, to take a stand against bullying. so we've, we're starting again, we've been spending the summer building, um, on one side building the funding to support it. we've partnered with jpmorgan, sears, first student, you know, we're happy to partner with others on the funding side. and on the other side we've been going to schools, um, and we've been talking to superintendents, and we've got -- we're looking at going, you know, back to school with some really big projects in different towns and cities across the united states. san francisco right now is committed to sending 25,000 kids on these field trips, you know, together over a two week period to participate in seeing "bully" in the theaters along with support i curriculum. washington, d.c., we've been talking at around 20,000 kids. new york city, same kind of size. and towns all across the america. and what we wallet to see over
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the course of, you know, early september to mid october is the target range for one million kids is, you know, really an opportunity for, you know, the national press, the local press to again pick up the story and tell the story of how people are using, um, the film to make a difference, using it as part of anti-bullying, um, plans that they have or creating new anti-bullying plans in their schools. and we're incredibly excited, and it's, um, you know, we don't see -- the film is not the solution. it doesn't, it doesn't -- it's not the end in and of itself. it's a vehicle to have the conversation and to push the conversation forward in, you know, a very public way but also person by person. we've got our facebook page is constantly filled with outpourings, um, from different
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students and teachers and administrators. um, and i'm going to read you just, um, in closing i'll read you, um, just one or two. this one is from the sioux city superintendent, paul guzman. participating in million kids created some of the richest and most meaningful discussion in our community. we have consistently said that we are not unique because we have bullying in our schools, but we want to become the school district that has made significant difference. then from the kids are always the ones that make us, you know, in the bully office we read them and get weepy sometimes. [laughter] i bullied, and i tried to fit in. of course, i realize now that i wasn't fitting in. i was becoming more of an outcast. so i started going around and apologizing because it takes one person to make a difference. that's from stephanie morris in washington.
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there's a boy in my seventh grade class who had been pushed around and bullied, and some of the kids took his clothes. now i want to be his friend, talk to him. and then one last one, um, if it wasn't for what i saw today -- this was right after a million kids, you know, trip to the theater -- if it wasn't for what i saw today, i probably never would have stepped in and stopped, and stopped it, to be honest. i probably would have ignored it. so, you know, daily we've got a crew of folks who work, you know, manage our social media, and, you know, it's a daily onslaught of amazing messages and posts on our facebook and e-mails, you know, really an outpouring, you know, from teachers and students who have participated or who want to participate in this. um, and, you know, we really, we really do feel that, you know, we are reaching a place of a
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national tipping point where as a result of all the work, so many different partners are doing and the extent to which, you know, the conversation has been changing around bullying, and the focus is not just on the victims and, you know, you know, the hard stories of how it's impacted people's lives, but it's also about the extent to which people are making huge strides to say something about it, to stand up, to have a voice. um, it feels like that, there really is a shift and we're happy and proud to be a part of that, and, you know, look forward to all of the next steps to helping bring that, um, forward. one last thing, our million kids campaign, we sort of wrapped that theatrical part in mid october and go into the
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long-awaited dvd release where we then will be able to complete our vision of one million kids. and the goal is to try to get the kids and the curriculum and other tools, um, that can, we hope, really make a difference into schools across america and beyond at a price point or less, you know, so that it can be really, really, really accessible as widely as possible. so we can start looking to that, you know, mid to late october. so -- >> thanks so much, sarah. [applause] next we're going to turn over to david washington who is going to talk a little bit more about the born this way foundation which i had the privilege to attend the launch of back in february. david? >> >> good morning, everyone. how are you? >> good morning. >> do we have more youth here? can i hear you clap? [applause] come on, you can do better than that. all right. how about the nonyouth?
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can i hear you clap? [cheers and applause] there we go. let's wake it up. so good morning, my name is david washington, i serve as senior adviser to lady gaga and the born this way foundation, it's been a great honor, and i'm excited to be here today because we get lots of phone calls from folks wanting to help. and we're doing a little bit of building the plane as it takes off. so i really appreciate everyone's help in the room with being patient, but i also want to share from lady gaga, who i spoke to a few days ago knowing i was coming here, her thanks to all of you. she was really excited, she made me prioritize me coming here, so between her and deborah over there, i couldn't say no. but she knows you guys are the experts on the ground, you're the leaders, and one thing that's really important to the born this way foundation is to not reinvent the wheel. so we're looking for best practices, we're looking for partners. we've had many good conversations with many of you
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on the room, some on the panel, and i just wanted to say thank you for that. so as you can see from underneath the logo, our goal, our mission is empowering youth and inspiring bravery. we are not a bullying foundation because gaga sees the world as a kinder and braver world, and what is that umbrella, what does that mean? there's many issues underneath that will contribute to a kinder, braver world, and part of that is preventing bullying. so that's why we're here today. i'm going to spend the next few minutes just giving you an overview of what's been happening the last year, actually just 30 seconds with the launch, but also share some of our goals moving forward. so as some of you may know, we launched on february 29, 2012, at harvard with our wonderful partner, the berkman center, that is our lead research partner. as you can see on the upper right-hand corner, that was gaga with oprah. we had deepak chopra, the head of our research advisory board
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and a couple others. so it was a really exciting day. on the left-hand side you'll see a picture of harvard's campus with the born brave bus. one of the more exciting things happening in 2013 will be the foundation bus tour that will be part of her musical tour. so who are leading partners, who are our founding partners? the california endowment, the mcarthur foundation and viacom and berkman, as i showed, and coming together we are focused on the mission to connect young people in a safe environment, provide them skills and opportunities to be the best they can be. and a quote from gaga in her own words about changing the world is: i do not believe one person can change the world. i believe humankind as a whole can change the world. so what is our motto, what is our approach? as i talked about the sso, safety, skills and opportunity, within safety as one of the earlier speakers talked about,
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roberto rodriguez, a former colleague of mine when we both worked for senator kennedy, talked about you have to first and foremost provide a safe environment for kids. and then skills. sel, social and emotional learning many of you know about, digital learning and media, one of the focuses of the mcarthur foundation that's been a dear friend to the foundation and their work, and then opportunities. once you provide a safe environment for kids and provide youth the skills, you also have to provide them with opportunity. so defining safety, peer validation support, mentoring health and emotional wellness, informed youth with knowledge of the resources, knowing what is available in their communities, youth-led with adult scaffolding. we know youth are the bomb. they can do fantastic things. but we also need parents, teachers, heads of local youth-serving organizations in the mix too. i want to go back to the third bullet just for a quick second. the health and emotional wellness part is really important to gaga. there is a lot of stigma around
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mental health irk shoes, and -- issues, and that's one thing the foundation will be doing a lot of work on. defining skills. when we talk about skills, ability to define, articulate and spread empathy, confidence to stand up for yourself and others, similar to the psa we saw from alice and cartoon network which was fantastic, dml and the digital media and learning side of things. one thing that's very important to the foundation as we engage youth is to inspire them to be makers and creators of things and not just consumers of things. so, for instance, with the ad council effort we're reaching out to participants, but could -- parents, but could there be a parallel where we reach out to youth for them to be makers and creators of condition -- content that lend itself toward a kinder and braver world? building on safety and skills, great pathways for young people to advocate for themselves, for each other, their schools, the communities and the larger world. so the born this way foundation
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believes civic engagement of youth within their communities is possible and necessary. so when we talk about youth, from the work we've done with some pilot groups and our partners and grantees, the youth have talked about the way they think about their world is, makes sense, them first. and then the next circle is their friends. then their school, then their community, then their social network and their world. so gaga never does anything small, so it's all about creating a kinder and braver world. so our principles fall in these categories; revolutionary/nontraditional, inclusive, cultural shifting. our practices will be and are youth-led, grassroots, online and on the ground, research-driven and an open tent partnership approach. these are a few of the things we're working on right now. i got calls before coming, and as i said before, partners have asked how they could get involved, and these are a couple
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tangible examples just so folks have an idea in the room. so research and insight leads things, and that connects to our rab, our research advisory board. so dr -- [inaudible] has dpraishesly volunteered and committed a lot of her time to help lead a research advisory board of about ten people that is guiding us with evidence-based practices. as a parallel to that, we're going to also have a youth advisory board which will be made up of youths themselves to kind of keep us honest. the collapse of the youth were kind of small -- claps of the youth were kind of small, but at least there's some. i've been to many conferences where it's adults talking about what we should do for kids without kids and youth in the room and young adults. underneath the research advisory board, you see the born brave bus tour. so a quick 20 seconds on that is gaga's on her world tour right now. she goes to europe in the fall,
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she just finished the asia pacific portion. through fall europe, and then in january 2013 she'll return to the states to end the tour. so it'll be 30 cities in three months. hard to believe, i still -- i'm not from the music industry. in talking to her, her last tour had 30 buses. stage, a couple buses for costumes and attire, right? her sound studio, she recorded her entire album on the road last time. and then staffing and so forth. so the thought was let's add a foundation bus to the entourage so when that pulls into the various cities on tour before the concert, it's a gal van nuysing e -- galvanizing event for the community. born this way online community and the born brave nation. so what is the born brave nation? local platforms grounded in the
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national born this way foundation structure, community based whether online or offline, these are all things we're having conversations with partners right now in terms of making it robust, but quality is possible. connects the unattached. so, ultimately, a vision of locally-based youth-led movement to drive cultural change. in terms of the online community, you may, some may be on the list sort of now, you get messages from gaga's mom and co-founder of the foundation who you'll hear tomorrow on the panel with valerie jarrett. internally, we like to play with the term what would a digital peace corps look like. it's a very grand vision, but the verbage tends to resonate with a lot, it resonates with me and kind of if we are thinking big, what would that look like? what would a digital peace corps look like? so that's a piece of the kind of aspirational nature of the townation and what -- foundation can. supporting peers, individual
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narratives, and one thing that's really great about being here today is all these other partners, so we're not siloed, but we're working together which has endless potential. the born brave bus tour, as i was telling you a little bit about, if you see those subbullets, what is the born brave bus? it's part tailgate party, part youth fair and part mobile research lab. so we'll be doing -- so partners in the room, it'd be great to talk to you about if you had access to hundreds of youth in 30 different cities over the span of three months, what are some of the research questions you'd like to ask? now, mind you, let me clarify. this is not for, for little monsters. the pop-up youth fair, this celebration is not for only youth going to the concert or adults. it is for -- think of it as a catalytic event for that community. the bus comes in, there's going to be all this attention, so why not galvanize the community? all those on the ground doing the fantastic work come
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together, and let's celebrate. so part tailgate party, part pop-up community youth fair, part research lab. so research, you've heard me reference that a few times. this is very important to lady gaga and her mom and the board of directors. so informing, measuring and refueling the movement, that's our research advisory board, consumer insights that ground our approach and language. one of our current, our lead media partner which has been fantastic is viacom. philippe dimon, their ceo, has shown great leadership and has hit it off fantastically with our leader, cynthia germ nada, so there's a lot of potential and excitement about what we can do together. and the last bullet, alter, inform, access and adapt strategy. so we will be constantly tweaking things. metrics, so we start with the researchers. we've been doing quite a bit of due diligence, we're developing our insights, then our strategy.
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four components of that are online which i've talked about, the web site, short form content. on the web site we have had a quarter of a million visitor, e-mail addresses, several thousand submissions of unique content, so that's very exciting. on the road, so that's the bus tour down the street, that's working with local organizations in the born brave foundation, and lastly on air with our viacom partnership. thank you. let's get to it. [applause] >> so i'll take a moment here before we move on to julia's presentation to mention that we want to make sure we accommodate asmany of your questions as possible to the panel, so i'm going to ask you to, please, write your questions, and we have some department of education staff who are going to come around and collect questions as they come. and we do have two more presenters, um, so it's my pleasure to turn it over to
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julie hertzing so who has led the initiative for several years and is behind the bullying prevention month of october which is very exciting, so -- >> thank you, deborah. well, we have the born this way foundation, we have the bully project, we have pacer which isn't exactly a household name. so i'll explain a little bit. pacer's an advocacy organization, and we're also based in the mid in min yap lit, and we were formed in 1977 to provide resources to children of families with disabilities who were involved in special education. you might ask what's the connection to bullying prevention? and we noted about a decade ago that we were receiving more and more calls from parents about bullying situations. the stories were really heartbreaking. parents said they didn't know what to do, what their rights were or what steps they could take, so we decided we want today take action. and as a result of that, we created pacer's national
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bullying prevention center. and our organization even though we were founded on a premise that working with families and children with disabilities with our bully prevention is for all stuarts. and we do have a unique emphasis on kids with disabilities. and we provide our resources through three avenues; education, advocacy and awareness building. and we primarily because we're a smaller organization provide our resources through our web site. and we have pacer.org/bullying which is for parents, professionals and community. and then we also have two wonderful, interactive, engaging web sites that are for the students themselves. and the first is pacer's teens against bullying which is for middle and high school students. so that web site leverages videos and stories and media content, excuse me, to help kids understand what they can do when they see a bullying situation. excuse me, let me take a drink
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of water. if they're involved in a bullying situation, um, and it's interactive, and it's animated, and there's a lot of great content on there. there's also our kids against bullying web site which is for elementary school students. our education that's provided to students, parents and educators through handouts, through classroom tool kits, through creative videos and stories. for example, our handouts include, we do a lot of parent-based information. we have a wonderful template letter for parents where they can go on and notify a school about a bullying situation and really a depth of resources on pacer.org/bullying. and wal provide a lot of direct -- we also provide a lot of direct advocacy to parents, teachers, schools, to students themselves, and we do that
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through our online resources, but we're also responding to hundreds, literally thousands of calls and e-mails from students around the country about what they can do when they see, when they're involved in a bullying situation. and we also received as many of these organizations with me do, calls from kids like what can we do to get involved? you know, we want to take action. so we offer some very grassroots activities for what kids can do at a very grassroots level, everything from a petition signing to holding an event. we also offer a lot of workshops for parents, for the community members themselves. and so parents come to our workshops, and we let them know what are their rights in a bullying situation, what can they actually do? so providing that really kind of grassroots, direct advocacy. and schools also call us. so we're covering all, you know, everything on the ground from the students, the parents, the
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schools, the community itself. and one of the really interesting things that we do is just building awareness of bullying prevention, and we like to be really unique and creative and innovative in how we do that. but we also look at what's easy for, um, students and schools to implement and what's accessible to a really wide audience? and i'll show just a few of these events. as deborah said, pacer back in 2006 had the vision to start national bullying prevention week which has actually evolved into a month. so nationally-renowned event that's widely recognized through the media and through several of our partners now which there's education going on, there's awareness building going on. you can also sign up as partners and champions on our web site, too, to support that event. pacer also holds, we hold locally three years ago an awareness-raising event called a run, walk, roll against
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bullying. again, it's about community coming together. there's preshows, postshows we've been able to get politicians involved with this, local media, and what we've done is we expanded those to be national events. we've created an online digital tool kit for people to download so they can hold their own run, walk, roll in their community. several are holding those in october and throughout the year as well. so a wonderful way to raise awareness, um, maybe raise money for your grass roots, local efforts that you're doing as well, or you can donate them back to our organization too. [laughter] last year, um, we held an event called unity day. and, again, pacer has the philosophy of looking at -- we don't look at bullying prevention, we don't look at it as anti-bullying, we look at it as bullying prevention. we want to be proactive, positive that this is about community and social change. and so unity cay -- day was a
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way to come together for people to engage in a dialogue about bullying, and it had a tangible call to action, and it was called make it orange, make it end. and the simple call to action was to wear orange or write unity on your happened, and thousands of people across the nation did this including ellen who supported it, talked about five minutes last year. on her show and wore orange o. so we're looking for that to be even a bigger event this year, and we've gotten thousands of contacts about that. so very visually, you know, orange is a powerful color, makes a powerful statement, it relates back to safety. we also had a really fun event called unity dance day. and, again, you're probably familiar with the concept, it was a flash mob dance. but what this is, a digital tool kit about using music and dance because, again, you know, always just doing more and more, um, you know, using art, using
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stories, storytelling, um, other ways so the kids can actually engage and take action and feel a part of this issue. and we have an online digital tool kit. it was written, the song that was selected, um, was written by the drummer for rascal flatts, and it was sung by a young girl, and the community came together to create a school kit around it, and that dance has been held in hundreds of high schools as well. and pacer just has a lot of student engagement. we are literally from, um, students around the world. we've heard from 195 countries where students have sent us their own stories, they've held fundraisers, kids will send in as little as $5 and say that i'm sending in my allowance because this cause is so important to me, and i want to make a difference. all the way up to students who have held fundraisers and maybe sold bands and sent us the proceeds from it. so, again, we talk about student engagement, and it's happening out there, and we see it happening every day.
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um, we also have a lot of students who are musicians or athletes who contact us and say we want to get involved. of and so we have, we help them share their message with the community too. we've also had the wonderful support and engagement from a lot of community partners, a few who are up here. um, ellen degeneres, facebook safety and privacy, yahoo! kids, cartoon network, the bully movie, we wrote a tool kit for the special needs task force on there again, going back to our roots of helping kids with disabilities. the mean stinks campaign, demilovato. real quick because i'm getting the notice to wrap it up, but what -- as far as in this future direction, i mean, from a grassroots level what we're seeing is that i think this used to be thought of a lot as a school issue. and that schools needed to solve
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the problem. but now, you know, going out into the community and hearing from our partners and from parents and from educators and from just community in general, everybody's wanting to step up and take action. it goes back to that it takes a whole village. and we're really seeing that movement happen. and i think parents and the kids themselves are also learning that they have rights in this situation, that there's laws out there to protect them and that we're really advocating, you know, learn what law it is in your state and learn how that can help you in a situation. if you go to, you know, if you try to resolve it and someone says, well, that's not really bullying or that's not such a big deal, what we always tell kids is go to your teacher and say i have the right to be safe at school, and here's my state law to do that. and it's really about changing the social paradigm of a behavior that was accepted for so long, and, you know, we keep talking about multifaceted efforts, ask that's really what
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it takes -- and that's really what it takes. we have accepted bullying or for so long, and our silence has perpetuated it. now by speaking out, by having students speaking out, we'll really start to change that social paradigm. so i'll conclude there, and thank you everyone. [applause] >> so last but not least i'm going to turn it over to my colleague, robert kim, to talk about a little bit of the once bullying happens, what can we do? >> thanks, deb. and, um, good morning, everybody. my name is bob kim. i do not work for lady gaga. [laughter] i work for the federal government which is almost as exciting. [laughter] i wanted to be brief here because i really want to hear your questions, so i will not belabor what we do at ocr. but let me just briefly say that, you know, we're here for you at ocr, office for civil rights.
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we know that, um, if students don't feel safe, they cannot learn. so it is our mission working in tandem with the rest of our, throughout our department to insure that students feel safe so that they can learn and be successful in their future lives whether they go on to college or have careers after high school. um, we know that a bullying is primarily a local issue and a school issue, but i'm here to say also that there are federal laws that are designed to address the situation also. um, there is, there are federal resources, there are federal laws, the ocr office is here to help states and local districts in this effort. not all of bullying acts rise to the level of harassment that our office could get involved in, but certainly if bullying escalates, becomes a harassment issue that's covered under our,
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one of our civil rights laws, for example, harassment that's serious and on the basis of race, color or national origin or sex or disability, certainly our office can get involved in that. and anyone can file a complaint if there's a serious act going on at a school. you don't need legal standing to file a complaint, just go to ed.gov, file a complaint, and one of our 12 regional offices will be in touch and can investigate the issue. we have 12 regional offices around the country and nearly 600 staff that are here to address these possible civil rights violations involving harassment and other civil rights issues as well. i will say that our office is getting more and more harassment complaints every year. for the last five years, the number of harassment complaints has gone up, and we expect that trend to continue. um, we do do a number of things.
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not only do we do enforcement where we investigate complaints and also we can proactively conduct investigations to deal with issues of harassment that we're seeing at the school level, but we also issue policy guidance. so, for example, in october of 2010 we issued a policy guidance that addressed bullying and harassment, and this is primarily designed to help schools understand what the laws are and to deal proactively and in a preventive way so that bullying and harassment don't escalate and become, become civil rights issues. one thing, notable thing in that guidance, we did clarify that under title ix the schools not only have an obligation to address and prevent sex harassment or harassment based on sex or gender, but that also gender-based harassment, so, for example, a girl that doesn't act stereotypically like a girl or a boy that doesn't can act
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stereotypically like a boy, those types of baers can also become -- behaviors can also become civil rights violations that our office is empowered to address. one thing that i wanted to mention, sort of a recent development or something that has happened in the last year involves our aknocke ca hennepin case. this is a case that senator r started in november 2010 with the department of justice, our colleagues there. we got involved early in 2011. you may be aware that this is the largest school district in minnesota. there are six middle schools and five high schools in this district. and what happened was that the government in partnership with a number of advocacy groups got involved in this investigation, and it resulted in a very substantial and ground-breaking consent decree that was entered into by the district court, federal district court in
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minnesota in march of 2012. the consent decree covers a number of issues ranging from training to revamping district policies. um, there's also things like a task force, certainly climate surveys that are being, now must be conducted at the school and hiring of several staff that are designed to help identify and prevent this type of problem from occurring in the future. and what we want to really point out here is that federal either concept decree or resolution agreements of this type, they're hopefully helpful at the site level. we've heard that students at the cool and the district certainly when the settlement was announced say that they already feel safer at the site level. but really what we're also trying to do is create model
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policyies and model practices that can be of service to other youth and districts around the country and nationally so that we prevent these types of harassment behaviors from happening in other districts not only the district at which this consent decree has been entered into. so, um, and certainly, you know, we know at the federal government level we cannot enforce our way out of the bullying problem nationally. law enforcement is only one tool among many, um, but that hopefully that we can at the federal level can serve as a catalyst, and we can drive conversations, we can drive policies and new behaviors at the school districts so that it can serve as a model elsewhere. which i think -- and i think with that i just want to stop here and open it up to questions or turn it back over to deb. >> wonderful. again. if you do have questions, please, write it down and hold
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it up, and one of our staff members will pick it up and hand it to me. i'm going to start out for the panel, for each of you to say what is the one thing you think we need to focus on in the year ahead? and i'll start down there with bob and go the other direction. >> what's one thing -- what's the question? what's one thing we need to do? i think, certainly, you know, both in my work at ocr, but also before -- and i think really one of the issues that i've learned that needs to happen at the school level is for there to be one person that's going to be the cat list, one person that's going to be the safe person at the school. and often the culture changes around that one person. so if we can find that one teacher, that one educational support professional, the principal or the vice principal or a parent, somebody in the commitment to be a real locus for saying that i'm a safe
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person, i can provide a safe place whether it's in my classroom, my office or outside of school. i think that helps a lot, and both research and other conversations have shown that having that one person is really, um, a helpful driver of further change. >> i would say there's several, but i'll throw out there the nonsilent approach to the intervention. as you talk about culture, talk about the bullied, the bullier, their family, the culture at the school, the culture in that community, that we all look at it as a system that is integrated and we don't just focus on one part of that system. >> that's a tough one. there's so many that i want to say. um, but i, too, would go back to it's a system because not just one, one, you know, point of view can resolve this. it needs to be school wide, it
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needs to be community wide. it really goes back to that change in the social paradigm and changing that perception that, um, you know, bullying is acceptable. we really need to just shift that. we all have a role in addressing this so that it's everyone's responsibility. >> i think i would, i would say the key for me is i've listened to folks this morning is safety. and, you know, i'm not ashamed to say i group up, i learned to drive in a car that had no seat belt, and i learned because you didn't have to have seat belts in cars then. um, now any parent in the room, your kid gets in the car, and almost involuntarily they buckle their seat belts. why? because we've been buckling them in since they were infants, it's an involuntary behavior because it made us safer in drivers. is there an analogy, how can we learn from what's worked in the past and apply it to our work as we go forward? >> um, i feel like this is a
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really, we're at a really critical moment, and, you know, i guess sort of different, but i'd like to as a challenge to all of us, i think we, you know, let's come back here in one year with having pushed all of our work forward as well as we can in all of the directions that we're doing -- we're going so that we can actually, you know, actually make this year a critical tipping point where we come back, and we, you know, are able to forge those relationships, you know, build the political, um, you know, con consensus to the point where it is no longer okay, um, the same way that drunk driving is no longer normal like it was when, you know, when i was growing up. and that we now, you know, buckle our seat belts. you know, it's -- the solutions are very complex, but i would like us to spend this next year,
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you know, recognizing that we're at a very unique moment in this particular, um, with this particular issue. and that we actually have an opportunity to do something, bring it home to roost and make it different for next, you know, going forward. >> great. um, so we actually had a question come in over twitter, and so for those of you watching at home, please, do submit your questions over at twitter using hashtag bullyingsummit. and this question is a lot of administrators are cautious now about addressing bullying as bullying because they're scared of that paper trail and legal system around it. so how can we change the culture and conversation from one of being scared of lawsuits to one of actually preventing bullying? um, and i might turn this over to bob first. >> well, i think, you know, hopefully administrators and schools will, first, want to do
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everything possible to create safety, and as people that are doing such hard work in schools, you know, education is not an easy business. and so, and safety is so important to the effective functioning of school. so, first of all, fears aside, you know, that is a terribly important goal that i think most administrators and teachers around the country really share. um, but there are duties, you know, under both state laws and sometimes local ordnances and also federal law, schools do need to be, take care that they are aware, that they have a duty to be aware of things going on in classrooms and in hallways enroute to school and from from school. it's not just school it, but also on bus stops and routes to and from home for children. so schools have to be aware of that, and i think certainly
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having policy in place, that's one really important place to start. if you don't have policies, then it's often hard to drive behaviors and systems around those policies. it is important to collect data. at the office for civil rights, we've spearheaded the data effort over the past couple of years to encourage schools to collect data on incidents of bullying and harassment, um, to catalog what type, what their bullying policies cover and also to keep track of schools -- students who are disciplined because of bullying. so data is also an important thing for schools to keep track of and be aware of. um, i will say one thing about, um, data and sort of students who bully and the sort of notion of zero tolerance. um, you know, certainly -- and this is reflective of a previous conversation that we've had here already -- certainly the mindset
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of zero tolerance is one that i think we all share, that we shouldn't tolerate even a single act of bullying or harassment. but there's a difference between that and promoting policies that could include sort of consist of or further disciplinary policies. we've seen in our data collection already that such policies may disproportionately affect students of color and other disadvantaged student groups. and also really, i mean, to further this conversation there's a question as to whether such policies are really effective when you isolate that student and remove that student from the classroom. is it really encouraging that student as well as the students around that student to learn from the behaviors? and also is there an issue around whether such, these kind of exclusionary politics will decrease or encourage schools not to up their reporting and
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data collection of bullying behaviors. we certainly want schools to keep track of bullying behaviors and not create incentives for teachers, for example, to be afraid that if they do report an incident, it's going to lead to the immediate ejection of the student from the school environment. so this is certainly a debate that we want to have, but we do share the mindset that we share zero tolerance and just how that translates into zero tolerance in a policy realm is a different question. >> i'll jump in real quick. thank you for clarifying that because i've heard some of the same issues around those zero tolerance issues, so thank you. in terms of the twitter question, something that gaga would say is just be brave. she talks about, well, what is bravery, what are actions of being brave? if you're at school and you see
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someone sitting by themself, be brave and go sit with them. i don't mean to demean the challenges school administrators have, but in that instance ideally that administrator would be brave. >> so this question is both for david and for sarah. um, one of our youth participants is asking that she's heard of, um, these initiatives and really wants to bring the one million kids project to her town, or she wants to get involved with the born this way foundation. how can they get involved? >> so with million kids, um, the -- if you go onto our web site, www.thebullyproject.com, there's a link right there for million kids. chick on it, um -- click on it, um, and this is going to take you to the steps where we've partnered with donors choose, you know, dot.com or dot.org that provides an online site for teachers, public school teachers, to create a project
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and to say i want to bring my school, my class to see "bully" in theaters, you know, and have it be, you know, free for me and my kids and, you know, to have this curriculum from facing history and ourselves be accessible to us. so if you're a student, take this to your, um, you know, take a student e petition to the superintendent of your schools. that would be the best thing to do is to try to start with getting it to be the broadest program possible in your community so that it's not just one class or one school, but, you know, you get your superintendents to know, the superintendent of schools to know you really want to do this. and you want them to bring this forward. and have them call, you know, me, and we'll help them figure it out, you know, to help bring a bigger project. but if it's a group of 200 kids or more, so a class or, rather, a school, you can set up an individual project. a teacher needs to set it up on donors choose.org.
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so -- >> who was the student brave enough to ask that question? i'd love to see you. fantastic. thank you. [applause] it's not easy to do that. so the answer is simple. if you haven't already, you would go to the born this way foundation web site which is born this way foundation.org. be part of the born brave nation. cynthia, a as we like to call her sometimes mama gaga, often sends out notes letting you know how you can get involved, so that's the west way. thank you -- best way. thank you. >> so this question i'm going to direct to julie and to alice. we talk a lot about supporting victims. now we're talking more about empowering bystanders. but the kids who bully are really not discussed. how do you think that we can try to evolve the conversations we're having to also include the kids who are bullying? >> um, i'll be really honest, that's why i'm here. i don't know. it's, we began our campaign
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focused on active bystander behavior because 85% of the kids that we talk to said what really bothers me is that i see my friends get picked on, i want to do something, and i don't know what to do. that was the focus of our campaign and has been. as we move forward, it's a question that we've wrestled with. um, but i'm looking forward to the conversations at this conference and looking forward to continuing to talk to our advisers because it's obvious that there are young people out there that were -- that we're not yet reaching, and we want to know how. >> i think, you know, a couple key pieces with this, and one of the strongest things we can do when kids are very young is start that empathy training and having them start thinking about, um, you know, from very early on that there are consequences when they behave a certain way. and, you know, to not take that zero tolerance step, but to really educate kids that there's other ways to behave to find out what the root cause of it is,
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why they're doing the bullying. sometimes kids are just testing out bad behavior, especially at a very young age. and given that opportunity to correct that, and, you know, the kids who are doing the bullying are just as at high of risk as the kids being bullied, so it's important we do include them in the dialogue. one of the things we really would love to hear from is our students about what your thoughts are too because it is an unrepresented population. when we first started doing bullying prevention, a lot of it was on, you know, it was about the target, it was blaming the target. and then we did kind of move toward the zero tolerance, and now we're moving toward the bystander. these are three distinct roles, but i think we should also remember that in the any given day you might be the target of bullying, you might be the person who bullies. you're going to, obviously, be the person who sees it. so it's human behavior. it's very complex.
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>> so we're going to have time for one more quick question, and then we're going to move to our breakout sessions. i know there are questions that we haven't gotten to, so i think the panel will stay up here for just a few minutes afterwards to talk to any of those questions that are still lingering. but this question is for bob. um, to clarify why we still expect harassment incidents to rise in reporting. >> i'm sorry, repeat it? to -- >> why is the expectation that reporting of incidents is going to continue to rise? >> well, that's, that's a tough question. i mean, i think a certainly we've seen the number of complaints rising, and maybe there's a positive aspect to this in that as students and communities become more aware of their rights, um, as they understand that, you know, it's okay not to be -- okay to come forward, to step forward, not to be silent and that we want, and to seek redress, i think, you know, perhaps one thing that
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we're seeing is more communities, more students, more parents are becoming aware of their rights and certainly as we publicize the availability of federal resources and investigators around the country that the numbers may continue to raise. i hope it's not the case that bullying and harassment is on the rise nationally. but certainly, you know, we're prepared to address all the complaints that come into our office. not all of them become official investigations, but, you know, certainly we're prepared to address them even as the numbers rise and, hopefully, as the proactive and preventive efforts take place around the country, there'll be a moderating effect in the future where the numbers won't be rising and rising and rising every year. >> great. so now we're going to have a
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brief break, um, and, please, try to arrive at your breakout sessions by 11:05 so we can have a rich discussion. your breakout session assignments are located on your name badges. for federal staff in the room, you have not been assigned to be in a specific session. please, distribute yourselves unless you are moderating one of the sessions and you know who you are and you know where you're supposed to be. i think they're going to -- yep, they just put up where each of the breakout sessions are. so, please, be there at 3 1:05 -- 11:05, and please try to be back in this room by 12:15. thanks so much, everyone. please give our panel a round of applause. [applause] knox 240bgs -- [inaudible conversations]
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[inaudible conversations] >> and wrapping up this morning's session of a daylong conference on bullying hosted by the education department. so far this morning they've covered parental involvement and anti-bullying campaign efforts. coming up at about 12:30 eastern, we'll hear from the first of the keynote speakers, that's maryland first lady katie o'malley, and at 5:00 eastern health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius. we'll have are live coverage of their remarks here on c-span2 and on c-span.org. and over on our companion network, c-span, we'll have a live briefing of the mars rover mission. the rover, named curiosity, landed on mars overnight. it's been beaming black and white images of the planet back
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to earth. officials in pasadena, california, will have the latest updates at 12:00, and that's on c-span. and our road to the white house coverage continues with the dnc's platform committee as the party adopts its new national platform ahead of this month's national convention. the committee is chaired by former ohio governor ted strickland. they met for three days last month in min annapolis, and you can -- minneapolis, and you can watch that meeting tonight at 8 on c-span. >> in the weeks ahead, the political parties are holding their platform hearings with democrats voting this weekend on their final platform recommendations in detroit. later this month republicans start their platform process at their tampa convention site. c-span's coverage of the party conventions begins august 10th with the reform party in philadelphia followed by live gavel-to-gavel coverage of the republican national convention beginning monday, august 27th, from tampa, and the democratic
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national convention from charlotte, north carolina, starting monday, september 3rd. >> we'll be covering more of the department of education's bullying conference throughout the day today. while we wait for the group to come back from break, here's some of this mornins session. ♪ ♪ [applause] >> hey, good morning, everyone. >> good morning. >> how y'all doing? good. welcome, welcome to washington d.c. welcome to our third annual summit. this is great. my name is michael ydin, i am the deputy assistant secretary for the office of elementary and secondary education at the department. the mission of my office, the office of elementary and secondary education, is to promote academic excellence and insure equitable opportunities for educationally-disadvantaged kids. and we have a number of great efforts and programs to support
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this mission. race to the top really learning challenge which provides kids with a great opportunity to start off right, particularly high-needs kids, give them access to high quality early learning programs. of we have our title i program which supports low income kids, makes sure they have the support and services necessary to succeed. we have grants to improve teacher effectiveness, we have programs to turn around our lowest performing schools, after school extended learning time, we have secondary programs that are geared to insure that kids have access to rigorous, high quality programs like ap or ib, dropout prevention programs and, ultimately, ultimately, our vision of success, our vision of success is to make sure that all kids are on track to graduate from high school college and career ready. but i gotta tell you as everyone
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in this room knows, we are not going to be successful in our efforts, we are not going to be srgful to make sure that all kids are on track to graduate from high school college and career ready if a child is not safe. or a child doesn't feel safe. and we're not just talking physical harm, we're talking emotional harm. a child cannot learn or thrive if he or she is in a culture of fear or disrespect. so we know that kids can't achieve their full potential if they do not feel safe. and we often, too often, understand there are some very serious and tragic consequences as well. so the best way the address bullying is to prevent bullying. i am so excited about this opportunity these next couple of days to learn from you guys. we can learn from each other. this is a really, really good
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opportunity. thank you, thank you for being here, for taking the time out of your busy schedules to be here with us. at this point i'm going to turn it over to my colleague, dr. deborah temkin, from the office of safe and healthy students, and she's going to kick us off. thanks. deborah? [applause] ♪ ♪ >> good morning, everyone. >> morning! >> so many of you have joined us in the past for our first two summits in 2010 and 2011, and i'm so pleased to see so many new faces in the room including a huge group of youth. so first thing i'm going to do is i'm going to ask you if you're under the age of 22, i want to hear from you. >> yeah. [laughter] >> throughout this summit i know some of them are arriving a little late, we're going to have
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about 30 youth in the room, but that's huge. because we know that in this issue is not one that's affecting us as adults, it's one that's happening every day to kids. and we can't do anything about this problem if we're not listening to the kids involved. so we're pleased to have you. thank you so much for being here. but what is our purpose for being here today? you know, we've had three of these. this is our third summit this year. what are we doing here? we're learning the best available research, and we're learning to collaborate with each other. we want to make sure that in all of our collective efforts against this very important problem we're not repeating what each other's doing, and we're actually furthering bullying prevention efforts. now, i want to say a special welcome to those who are joining us via live stream on stop bullying.gov and remind you at home that you are welcome to participate with us via twitter and facebook. using hashtag bullyingsummit.
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now, it is my great pleasure to welcome to roberto rodriguez, the special assistance to the president for education. now, roberto has a firm of great achievements, um, starting at la raza and going to the senate help committee where he worked with senator kennedy. he is now the white house's lead on education, and i first got to meet him when we started discussing the white house conference that was held in march 2011. he is one of the sweetest and most generous guys i've ever known, um, and one of the most brilliant minds that i have ever had the privilege to interact with. so with that, i'm pleased to welcome roberto rodriguez. [applause] ♪ ♪
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>> well, good morning, everyone. >> morning. >> it's my pleasure to welcome you to the third annual federal partners in bullying prevention summit. and i want to start today's conference by giving a very warm thanks to our administration's leaders on this important issue across our federal government from the departments of education, justice, health and human services and all of our other federal partners. many be hours of time and effort were invested to bring us all together here for this important work, and we're dateful to -- grateful to them for all they've done to make this week's summit a reality. i'd like to ask you to join me in applause for all of our federal staff who have worked on this issue. [applause] ..
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and to dispel the destructive myth to bullying is just a harmful rite of passage or in an editable part of going up. it is not. and at that convening we heard about the devastating effects of bullying. we learned about some tragic experiences and circumstances that dashed the dreams in the lives of young people. but we also heard stories of great courage, and we were inspired by young people who were taking a stand and taking action in their schools, in
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their neighborhoods, on line and with their peers to stop bullying. they brought new ideas and new solutions to confront this problem head-on. most importantly, they demonstrated a zeal and a determination to make a difference. many of you in this room share that spirit and that determination and we want to celebrate bad spirits during this week's convening, because our administration shares them too. with that, we also want to explore new ways to work together to stop bullying now. we still have a long way to go. this past year alone almost three millions students have been reported that they have been bullied, pushed or shoved on the playground or the way to school, chipped in the hallway or even spit on. during the school year a third of middle and high school students reported being bullied. and as we all know the behavior isn't just contained to our
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classrooms into our schoolyards. it can follow children from the hallways to their cell phones to their computer screens. we all pay the price for this, from absences during the school year to poor performance in the classroom and more devastating and far-reaching effects. anyway that you look at this, our children suffer when bullying occurs. now i still consider myself a relatively new parent. i have two children, four and six at home and one thing you learn as a parent particularly as your children start school is that their journey to adulthood will be challenging regardless of the circumstances. growing up can be a time for thoughtful introspection. when you come into your own you begin to feel comfortable in your own skin and at the same time, growing up can produce insecurity. insecurity that is either
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exacerbated or defused by a child's child surroundings, by their peers, by their school, by the neighborhood in which they live. we have all been there. we have experienced this transition in our own lives with all the highs and lows. as a parent i have already started to watch my children experience life. already filled with few moments of downfall and of up rising and as they grow up there will be moments of hope and there will be some moments of disappointment in their lives. but as parents, we all want to provide space for them and make sure that they are able to make their own decisions, to learn from those decisions along the way. but there is one area where there is no paradox and no gray area. above all things, we want their our children to be safe. that responsibility to provide a safe environment for our children starts at earth.
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it is instilled in all of us as parents and when a child is elite, we have failed that duty. we can't place the blame on any one individual for how that bullying came to be but we must all know and we must all remind ourselves that we have had a role in preventing it from happening. as parents, as teachers and community members and is caring adults we must all be proactive to make sure that we stop bullying before it starts and it's from those instincts that president obama has placed such an emphasis on bullying prevention and used his position as our president and as a parent to provide leadership to stop bullying when we see it in before it starts. when we fall short of keeping our kids safe and free from bullying the president reacts as any parent would. what if that had been my child? we have seen too many lives damaged and too many children
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suffer from the words and actions of oley's. no child should be made to feel unsafe and alone. as the president has said we have got to make sure that our young people know that if they are in trouble there a caring adults and young adults who can help. if they are having a tough time we have got to let them know that they are going to get through it and that there is a whole world of possibility that is waiting for them. a commitment to ensuring the safety of our children has been a central tenant of powered administrations brought a staffer to prevent bullying. six cabinet agencies, the department of agriculture, defense, education, health and human services, interior and justice along with more than 80 federal and external partners nationwide are collaborating to help prevent bullying and to keep young people safe and to create a climate in our schools
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and in our communities that support all young people. art administration has been aggressive in our efforts to identify the problem and to address it and we have several milestones that we have to show for it. we have launched stop bullying.gov for a a one-stop integrative resource for children, parents, teachers and community members to identify bullying and to find ways to end. we have improved data collection at the department of education to better understand the scope of the problem and the prevalence of rolling across our schools. at the same time we have issued more effective policy guidance aimed at protecting students against harassment based on race, national origin,, gender and disability. we have taken new steps to urge governors to establish and adopt comprehensive anti-bullying policies. we have launched robust advocacy
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campaigns through offices such as the department of justice community relations service and through the department of health and human services health resources and substance abuse and mental health services administration. to expand awareness in what bullying is and to provide the resources and toolkits to prevent it. and of course, we are all joining together to host this week's summit to further explore how this issue impacts our families and our communities and to chart steps for future success. so i want to be sure that i do two things before i conclude this morning. the first is to thank each and everyone of you for your presence here today. our organization is grateful for your participation in the shared work and for everything that each of you have done and will continue to do to prevent and stop bullying. over the next two days you will hear from a number of art administration officials from all of the departments that i
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have mentioned. we will go into greater detail about the initiatives and the goals that we have at the federal level. you will also hear from our partners in the private and nonprofit sectors who are force multipliers in this effort. and that brings me to my second task which is to enlist your support and your partnership in moving forward. the programs you will hear about both inside and outside of the government are making great strides to stop bullying. our challenge is not necessarily to develop the new initiative or to reinvent the wheel but rather to explore how we can work together and collaborate to expand the impact of the investment and efforts that are already underway across the country. we all share the same goal, and we can double down on our impact if we work together to achieve a new culture of risk that in our schools and in our communities.
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a climate where all of our children feel safe and know they belong. this is the end toward which our collective work inspires. so i hope this summit will inspire a renewed commitment in an effort on this critical issue that will bring us forward and help urge us toward greater action. it's up to each of us to act against bullying. it's wrong, it's destructive and it can be prevented. thank you so much. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> thank you so much. i think he deserves another round of applause. [applause] the commitment this white house
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♪ >> thank you very much and good morning. this is not my first time at this podium. last year i attended the summit and spoke alongside panelists from facebook and time warner as well as a man named kevin jacobsen. kevin and ninth-grader from new york has been a bit demo rolling and tragically took his own life. as many of you know just seven months ago we lost kevin too. he was an important advocate for bullying prevention and like many of you we were devastated by this news. we feel his loss deeply and we are honored to continue his work. in a world where we are
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constantly hearing new data and shocking statistics, it's important to keep in mind that bullying is an intensely personal issue and beautiful lives are lost as a result. we are all here today because bullying is one of the most pressing social issues facing our country. it has led to devastating consequences for our children, our families and our communities. i am honored to be joined today by a marlo thomas who we all know well. marlowe is the founder and president of the free to be foundation she has been a champion for all children facing adversity throughout her life. together we will preview a new national multimedia public service campaign designed to empower parents to teach their children how to be more than a bystander. whether it's underage drinking or obesity prevention, we know that parents play a critical role in preparing their children
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for the challenges that they may encounter. the ad council's psa campaign which will launch this october, will specifically target parents. this campaign is truly unprecedented in nature. this single crusade has brought together public foundation, corporate and support. our partners on this effort include aol, facebook, they're free to be foundation, the way institute for violence prevention, johnson & johnson and the u.s. department of education and health and human services. and our cause has been needed by the pro bono resources from dvb, communis and care as well as generous media support from clear channel, aol, facebook and many others. we are delighted that some of our partners have joined us today and i would like to take a
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moment to acknowledge them. over here we have joe and jenny. also from cartoon networks, alice cahn. thank you so much for all that you are doing in this effort and a very special thanks to deb temkin's from the department of education for all her input and guidance and organizing this terrific summit. [applause] the campaign was developedith help from a very and gauged advisory group many of whom are also with us here today and we really appreciate your valuable feedback. nearly three out of four children in our country witnessed a leading. bullying. research has shown that parents don't see an inherent need to talk to their kids about bullying and less their child is involved in an incident or approaches them to talk about it. however we all know bullying affects all children regardless
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of whether or not they have personally experienced it. while the vast majority of kids want to stop bullying, they are unsure of what to do. less than 20% of kids who say that they have witnessed acts of bullying have reported taking any action to stop it. i know what you are thinking. intervening during an act of a leading can be very scary for a child. our campaign campaign will educate parents about how to be proactive in talking to their children about bullying and arm them with a list of low risk actions that they can take. as a bystander. actions like tell an adult, the friend of the person being bullied and don't give bullying and audience. through a series of new tv and web ads as well as social media channels, he will not only get this on parents radar, we will ensure that they have the best tools to address a leading and
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prevent tragedies. this is a very complex and multi--- multifaceted issue but we are hopeful or campaign will engage parents and help them understand their critical role in solving this problem. in just a moment we will preview the first psas on the campaign but first i would like to introduce to you the perfect example of how one person can empower others through social good. i first got to know marlo thomas as ann marie in the sitcom batgirl. she was a role model to me and most girls and young women in the seventies. today, i remain in awe of her force of nature, particularly how she continued her father's work on behalf of st. jude's hospital racing over $700 million every year for children with cancer. [applause]
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marlowe is the president of the free to be foundation and she has worked for nearly 40 years to help children challenge stereotypes, fight discrimination and encourage encourage him to fail jollity and a professional prayer pledge to work with her on her upcoming psa campaign and i'm delighted to have her with me today. please welcome marla thomas. pplause] >> thank you. i have also worked for aol and "huffington post" where i have my own web site and i do quite a bit of blogging. i've done a dozen blogs on bullying and in fact i heard from kevin jacobsen. he reached out to me after reading a few of them and wanted to meet and talk and i was heart rogan as everyone else was when he took his own life. it was quite a shock that he finally just gave up hope on the anniversary of cameron's death
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and left -- devastated. it became apparent to me that i needed to get even deeper involved and that is why i brought in the free to be foundation because it's the idea that we are targeting parents is so correct. we learn from our parents, my first lesson on allaying i learned from my father. i will never forget, we were driving in the car. i was eight years old and there was some little boys beating up on another little toy and my father stopped the car and jumped out of the car. i was terrified and i remember look into the back window at what my father was doing and he was shaking them and talking to them and pull them apart and then he told the little boy that was being bullied into our car and we took him home -- home. my father was very upset and he said i hate a bully. i remember it to this day. i remember what street it was. it was such an enormous effect
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and had such an enormous effect on me. i thought of that when i started hearing about targeting parents because we learned so much. we learn everything from our parents. either by example or by word but getting parents to chile get involved i think is the key to stopping this. all of the research comes down to these points. children are all alone with this problem. many many teachers turn the other way. their friends abandoned them out of fear that they too will be targeted if they side with the victim. kids themselves are ashamed to tell their parents that they are not liked at school or they can't handle themselves or if they tell them they will look like a wimp to the other kids and get beaten up even more. there's just no exit for them. they are absolutely trapped. so it really is up to the parents to look for the signs of
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what it looks like when a child is wholly. do they not get invited to birthday parties? did they come home crying? do they not want to go to school in the morning? they have a strange stomach ache or they don't want to take the bus. these are all signs that this child is having a bad time at school. also as a parent to be honest that if your child is the bully. so many parents are in denial that their child is doing this to other children and that is a huge problem. we have to speak to those parents as well. the last thing and the third thing for me today is to instill into your child that if you don't stand up for a child that is being bullied, who will be there to stand up for you? this is how you grow. this is what they say in the bible, treat others as you wish to be treated. yes, stand up or for who will be there for you? i have been speaking to a lot of families since i started my
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whole campaign on aol and "huffington post" and i spoke to one mother who told me that she had no idea that her son was being bullied. one day she got a phonecall from a mother of one of his friends. the little boy's name was jack. one of jack's friends mothers called her and said i wanted you to know that my son came home crying today. they are nine or 10 years old. my son came home crying today because he just couldn't take it anymore watching his friend jack being bullied by this bigger kid. she said today jack was being in in the cafeteria and this holy kid came behind him and smashed them in the back and the kid choked on the food. he helped him up but it was a dangerous situation. so the mom went to jack and said did something happen in school today? he said no. she said did you have some kind of fighter something? he said no, so she called the mother back and she said, he
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said no. just a minute, let my put son -- my son on. little billy gets on the phone and is crying and tells jack's mother what is happening so jack's mother goes back to jack. jack i jack jack i just spoke to billy and this is what he told me. and jack cried and admitted that it did happen. the mother did do something. she called the school and they call the parents of the bully and the little boy was the witness. they went into a room at school and after the whole thing was done, the little boy that was the victim crying, the little boy that was the witness was crying. the boy that had done the bullying said that wasn't what happened. the parents of the child who had bullied said they believe their child and their child would never do a thing like that. anyway, kids do things like that. there was an absolute disconnect ramallah these people in this room. this mother, i am in touch with her and she still is involved in
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it. thankfully this goalie who was picking on little jack kind of slowed down his momentum because he is being watched now. but you can even get them in the room so you have to really dig away at all the parents. the parents of the bystander and a bully and the parents of the child who is the victim. it really is time for parents to take charge. i am proud to be a part of the ad council and facebook in aol and the ryan family foundation and the department of education and j&j in the crater of the bullying movie focusing on parents to realize that this issue impacts all children. the resource of this campaign is stopbullying.gov and what i've tried to do is focus. by talking to the parents, talking to the children.
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i spoke to dozens of parents but i spoke to a 15-year-old girl whose younger sister is around nine years old and she has a lot of special disabilities, and she of course gets bullied. this older sister is trying hard to pave the way for her little sister to stop being victimized. one of the things that she had done with her and her friends had 15 and had been doing this for a couple of years as they got together to do this smile and hug program. and when they see a kid that is by themselves a little rural maybe, they focus on the girl. the little girl is being shunned and being alone. they make sure that nobody feels alone and when they walk down the hall they see somebody that is sad and they give them a big smile and a hug. they are doing in their own way what we are trying to get people to do, to acknowledge and to see it, to bring some warmth and
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light to it. i was just so touched by the little girl named john of. you know, i have devoted a great deal to my life since my father's death 21 years ago to raising money for the st. jude's hospital. i spend a great deal of time there. i see these children and how compassionate they are, little four and 5-year-olds hugging 2-year-olds who are losing their hair and not feeling well and feeling nauseous from their chemotherapy. they are so compassionate to each other and i look at them and i think, that compassion that is there, why can we put that potential into children who are able-bodied? what is this necessity to hurt other children? i look at it if the children at st. jude and i see such compassion such strength and such love in such capacity for joy in the face of diversity. we have to find a way for all of
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the children, to find a way to bring the goodness out of children. while we are talking to the parents, the parents need to find a way to bring the goodness out of their children. you also have to bring out their goodness. i went to, i do a lot of interviews from my web site and i interviewed kelly ripa last week. she is a mom with three kids and they go to a school. she said she looked for a school because she was very worried about their children. they are mexican-american. their mom is famous and there were too many ways in which they could be taunted. she found a school that had a zero tolerance, zero tolerance for bullying and she said one little toy called another boy and was expelled and i will tell you something you can have all the government committees that you are on and you can have all the wonderful organizations which -- but if we don't start
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having a zero tolerance in schools, this is going to go on and on. i truly believe that if some child is cruel to another child he should end up being expelled. we have got to stop it. we have to pull those children out of the schools because i don't know, how else are you going to prevent it? there other ways i'm sure but i would like us to start thinking about zero tolerance. i do know that in my work with children, with st. jude and with children around the country who are speaking to them and helping them through a lot of bullying situations it needs all of our energy and i hope next year when we come to this event we can look at each other and say look, it's we have accomplished this year. look, it's pain we have stopped. i hope that we can do that and i wish you luck and god bless you on your way. [applause]
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>> you see how lucky we are to have marlo in our camp on this? thank you so much for your partnership marlo. she is really incredible no matter what form she has. she always manages to work in the bullying campaign and enlist so many people to help us with this effort. understand they're supposed to be a -- i haven't seen it though. if you guys in the back ones to invest -- advance forward that's okay too. i see it. okay. thank you. and now what we have been waiting for, the psas that you are about to have been developed pro bono by a very talented team from new york-based ad agency dvd who i mentioned earlier and without further ado, let's take a look at our new tv spot.
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>> your hair looks frizzy today. you are such a dork. here, let me help you with that. >> every day kids witnessed bullying. >> oh let, your crush is looking at you. >> they want to help but don't know how. >> teacher kids how to be more than a bystander. visit stop bullying.of. [applause] of course her campaign is more than television spots and i would like to take a second to give you a quick look at some of the print ads. here is the print. for the city they can't read it the first one says you are worthless perk zero you don't see bullying like this every day. your kids do. teacher kids how to be more than
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a bystander. learn how at stop bullying.gov and the second everybody hates you. you don't see bullying like this every day. your kids do. teacher kids how to be more than a bystander. learn how at stop bullying.gov. we are developing web banners that have a similar look and feel to these printouts. as you can see each of our campaign components will direct parents to stop bullying.gov. this site provides parents with engaging and interactive resources including the abilities of? on each of the bystander tips to receive more information. each tip will include video content from experts, kids and parents. i would like to leave you all with one more powerful psa created with the lee kirsch's remark of go -- remarkable footage.
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this footage is courtesy of the bully project in the weinstein company. we are grateful for their collaboration and i'm sublack that sarah foudy from the bully project could join us here today. [inaudible] >> every day kids witnessed bullying. teacher kids how to be more than a bystander. visit stop bullying.gov. >> what the lee manages to capture on camera is a poignant reminder about the importance of equipping our children to be more than just bystanders. before we take questions for a minute or two i would like to say once again that none of this
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would be possible without the tremendous support of our extraordinary partners. this is an unprecedented event where so many have come forward to provide corporate and media support, nonprofit leadership and government resources to take on such a critical issue. i know it will have an impact. for those of you who have party done so much to fight bullying we thank you. we are proud of what has already been accomplished and we are excited as we look towards her october launch. now i would like to open up the discussions to discussion to questions from the audience. i can't quite see. to the microphone. >> good morning. i work with wire safety, teen angels. maybe you don't know that group
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of people. i have another proof that i work with that we really need help with. i work with the education association and there are teachers going into teachers -- classrooms who have no training. we have a toolkit and some of you have these things too but how do we get that information to the teachers, to the universities, to the colleges and community colleges? >> as a sneak peek to something you'll hear about tomorrow, the department of education there are technical assistance center is excited to announce a module for training and i am looking over here at tim duffy and sande about that later. we agree that teacher chad training is an important aspect and we won't do want to provide
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to those tools. >> hello. i am dewey cornell from the university of virginia. i wanted to raise some concern about the suggestion that we use expulsion as tall -- zero tolerance for bullying. as you may know the american psychological association of a task force that studied intensively the policy of zero tolerance that has swept around the country and found primarily negative effects and no evidence that zero tolerance was in effect a policy that kept schools safer. they also found that it tends to be used in a highly discriminatory manner, that long-term suspension policies are disproportionately applied to minority students and drive up on dropout rates. there are more -- and i would hope that we would bring together some of the research support for those alternative approaches. >> again you are previewing what
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we will have later. tomorrow we will have a panel on supporting bullying which will look at the effects bullying has on the kids who are doing the bullying and ways that we can help support them. >> if i could just jump in on that as well. i think that there is an imperative here though that we have our schools and our states really adopt comprehensive policies that are research-based themselves accountable for bullying and if we do more to make sure we are identifying those policies that work best and again, i want to just commend our federal partners and the department of education for really documenting state-wide state-by-state, looking at what those policies and practices are at the state level and doing more to really disseminate that so we get more research-based policies in place. that has just got to be a huge goal for us.
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>> hi. i am with with the university of illinois at urbana-champaign. i wonder, with the research showing connection between exposure to family violence and bullying perpetration how are you going to reach those parents that may not go to your web site to learn bystander intervention because the very behavior we are seeing in their children stems from their own violence within their homes? >> i see that might've been a question regarding the communications program so i will take a stab at that. i think what we see in creating social change is that it's not anyone message. i think that we execute across save for radio platforms and hopefully over time, change the norm about what is acceptable and what is not acceptable. there are so many different ways to create a conversation in the dialogue. you see that through mass media and you see that through social
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media and eventually hopefully it also becomes word-of-mouth. so we are really set during and on it from every angle. >> my name is jonathan cowen and i'm from the national school climate center and teachers college columbia university. i wanted to say two things. first, thank you. i think it's extraordinary the government of the ad council are coming together and really explicitly appreciating the -- that bullying is never an individual act and punishment is unhelpful. you are really highlighting the role of the witness is a tremendous contribution. my second thought though is in addition to parents being key change agents as you the organizers of this conference are explicitly saying, students are also teach agents and we can come and i would suggest we need to support students paying up
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standard ambassadors. students learning in detail about what does it mean to be socially responsible? you can support and we can all support students and parents and teachers who need to be integral partners, thinking and struggling in the best sense of the war together about what does that mean to be socially responsible? how can we be end up standard rather than a bystander and the up center alliance has a series of ideas to support that. >> can i just remarked to that? i had the opportunity to preview the movie "bully" before it came out and as everybody knows it's an incredibly powerful movie. then i saw a link on a facebook page. they were premiering the movie of kodak theatre in los angeles and there were nearly 1000 kids in the audience. i was like my goodness these
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kids ought to see this movie and that is what is going to change the future. >> my name is dr. farkas and i serve on the president's advisory commission. i just want to echo the comments of the previous comments about the outstanding work that these psas are represent and they're really powerful images. my question really is about whether there are plans to have those ads and other languages, like spanish and perhaps eventually asian languages as well? >> that is a terrific observation. we do translate at council campaign and actually we do more than that. we do primary research and minority populations, hispanic -- to understand the cultural references and get the
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language just right. it's really a matter of funding because we have to reimburse our partners for their out-of-pocket and all of this is done pro bono. we hope this campaign will thrive and survive for years and there will be many iterations of that so thanks for your support. >> hi, good morning. my name is colleen and i'm from asian-american united of philadelphia. i have two questions. one was i really appreciate the president's administration focusing bullying and moving it from an individual relationship based situation to recognizing the institutional impact it has within schools in particular and having justice department and the education department working specifically around institutional issues. my question is about the centers for disease, the cdc's definition around bullying which has been sort of a problem at
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least in philadelphia in terms of understanding how institutions respond. the definition talks about how bullying is relationship based experienced over time in which one person is physically larger, stronger, mentally quicker or socially more powerful than the other. the concern has been that it locates gang -- blame within the victim and doesn't seek out solutions for the entire situation for teachers, administrators, community people. proper solution so i was wondering if you could maybe talk about -- i am not denying the cdc's definition because i understand psychologically that is based on behavioral health and mental health but when it's an institutional setting at does have -- there may be a different way at looking at bullying. >> so the cdc definition has not yet been fully released yet.
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it is pending release probably by the end of this year but it is not too precise when it will be out but it should be out in the next several months. the point to clarify the purpose of the cdc mission is that it is a research definition. more work is going to need to be done in order to translate that into a policy definition and there are very precise distinctions between a policy definition and research definition but in order to get the policy definition we need to have some sort of consensus in the literature. right now if we look at the literature of the antecedents of bullying might be to develop our prevention strategy, people are varying in their definitions there so it's hard for us to develop a comprehensive understanding of protective factors might don't have a common definition even in the research. i think that is a very important place for us to start and we definitely need to have more of
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those conversations about how it has translated into policy. >> good morning. i am with a the national association of secondary schools principals. i am here to thank you for being partners in the situation. i think it's very common for public school education to get thrown under the bus every time there is a problem and we are ready and willing to be part of the solution and not heart of the problem. so my question is to you, school starts monday morning. we are ready, the doors are opening. the kids are walking in. could you give us some indication of timelines so that we as the leaders in our schools can support our students and communities in your effort? >> do you mean timelines for the campaign? >> for the campaign, yes. >> we will be rolling out the campaign in october.
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it will appear in of course all media platforms as i mentioned earlier and we see this as a multimedia campaign. we want to be pushing it out to all of the constituents here particularly on the web, so we hope to engage you through all of those various organizations that are represented here today. while it will start in october, i think that what i mentioned earlier to the gentleman that asked about the hispanic language execution, this is a long-term effort. we are going to be there with you for years to, and just as we have with issues like seatbelts and drunk driving and a fur for idf other social issues that we know communications can help change the norm. that is really our long-term objective and thanks for your role in advancing to help push it out. >> i want to also add to that
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and also applaud you for being here and thank you for committing our principles -- and the "post" to this work. are principals aren't important part of the solution here. not only are they instructional leaders but they are the place to go to make sure that we are building a safe -- that our culture is conducive to social and emotional for kids and make sure everybody feels included and belongs in a school. they create that climate, so we can't get there without our principals leadership really in identifying bullying as a key priority in stopping that and doing more throughout the year to address the challenge with their staff. >> i will point out one more thing, the kids around bystander information are going to be life. with the full interactive module you will see will launch in
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october along with the rest of the campaign that you've got a sneak peak right now along with other updates including a brand-new tip page sewing courage of if you have not been to stopbullying.gov, go back. >> good morning. i lost my son in 2000 to two bullying so i've been at the grassroots level of this for the last 10 years and i want to say this is important and it's just a huge thing for me to be here. i have been here each year to such a conference in bringing people together because it will take unity. this is a community activity since day one when i first started talking about this. in 2003 when it was basically laughed at by people. so we have come a long way and i think we do have to embody kids and empower them. they are the key. we have to move them forward and i have seen great things.
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i think it's great and tremendous that we are focusing now on the parents and getting information to those parents because sometimes they been locked out by schools. also through the department of education to push schools to make sure they are getting information to those parents because everyone has to do this. we brought law enforcement into this as well. two makes -- to talk to schools while bringing law enforcement into the fold so it's a great thing and i think the ad campaign is great. do you have any plans for an ad campaign to encourage participation by students across the united states? >> said something about a campaign of a contest for students. get them physically involved because when they do become involved they change rapidly. so thank you to everyone who is here. >> thank you so much. i would just add that these sorts of issues when we take among particularly in working with partners like the people in this room today, we find the
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next generation, the next population so i am sure that at some point in time there will be a specific effort toward students but we think the most fertile area right now is to reach them through parents. >> unfortunately we do need to move on tour next panel. i do see that you have questions but perhaps we can ask them of our next panel. thank you so much. we are just going to take a moment or two to transition to the next panel. [applause] >> more from that bullying summit in just a moment. on a companion network c-span a live briefing of the mars rover mission. the rover name curiosity landed on mars overnight. you can see some the technician celebrating that landing. it has been teaming black-and-white images of the planet back to earth. officials in pasadena california will have the latest updates at 12:00 eastern on c-span and
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night at 7:00 p.m. a booktv.org event, discussion about where the trillions of dollars that make up our federal budget come from and where that money goes with pulitzer prize winner david wessel the economic editor for "the wall street journal." more now from this morning session. >> please take your seats. part of our role here this year is to think about the actions that it happened over the course of the year that have made an impact on bullying prevention and i am so happy to welcome an amazing panel representing some of the major news items, advocacy etc. around the bullying this year. their goal is to tell you a little bit about what happens but also to think a little bit about where we go from here.
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so i'm just going to briefly introduce our panelists and let them have their time. sarah foudy is the campaign director of the bully project and of course lee hirsch who a lot of you have seen. alice cahn is the vice president of social responsibility and she is in charge of the stop bullying speaketh up campaign and david washington among other accomplishments is the man behind the scenes for the born this way foundation. lady gaga's kindness initiative. julie hertzog is the director of the national bullying preventer -- and teens against bullying and robert kim is my colleague at the department of education. we will talk a little bit about some of the enforcement cases that ocr has done in the past
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year. please help me welcome them. [applause] it looks like we have alice's presentation cued up so alice, you are up. >> thanks very much. if someone could turn those lights down. to talk a little bit about the accomplishing to the past year and then also the next steps as we look ahead to the 2012/2013 school year and beyond. work on stop rolling speak up. can i look at the slide up there? i would much rather have them look at this slide then it may. "stop bullying: speak up" began in 2008 when our audience told us as young as six through 13 except for tom and jerry as young as three and as old as 83. and what kid said to us of all
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the things that are worrisome and there are a lot. my parents are out of work -- the one thing they told us was bullying especially when they saw their friends get picked on, that was the ring that really bothered them and the thing they thought they could change if someone could just show them how. there we go. so our campaign focuses on empowering youth and adults to be active bystanders. and with the help of a truly stellar advisory board, we build an educational campaign on an entertainment network. we lost some names on this slide. but i'm sure you recognize. we couldn't have done it without the folks pictured on this slide and thanks to robert glass who is to point out earlier helped bring youth advisers to the table and as an advisor this
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year. what kids told us was, don't tell us what to do, show us what to do. our first video suggests that. they modeled the active bystander behavior so kids can watch other kids act out and react to certain situations. the follow up research and this came up on the first panel, evaluate the efficacy. we heard while young people appreciate this advice and this is why i'm so lab at council is talking to parents and adults, you know we modeled what our advisers help us understand and one of the best things young people can do to be active bystanders is to tally trusting adult. kids say well i did that but then the adult didn't do anything so now what do i do? we went back to scripting and it to add information about how active bystanders could reach
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out to victims after a bullying incident and both those findings were integrated into the second psa which i hope we can play now. what do you think they do now? is there some tech help? i will move on. so in addition to the video that you are not seeing, let me share some information that we have garnered recently from our audience of six to 12 euros. we have been on the air since october 2010. our campaign along with work done by our partners many of whom are sitting at this table and including the anti-defamation league who i -- and the glisan. we all know kids sitting in this
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room. repetition is a crucial part of working and that is as true for preschoolers as six to 11 euros and on up but for the parents in this room we know that when you say the same thing over and over again is like telling my kids to clear the table and doing their own laundry, we fear that it becomes almost white noise. what we have learned is and i am way ahead of another slide, but in the research we heard this spring, we heard kids say the following things. can i go back one? young people and parents alike see bullying is a key issue impacting young people's lives. kids and parents are interested in a variety of information about bullying prevention and they are especially perceptive to seeing that information in schools. despite increased attention in school, on television, on line, on mobile studies there is still
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a need for easy to find option double information about bullying prevention. kids literally said to us yeah you have been telling me. i hear you, i am starting to do it but don't stop putting it out there. keep putting this information out. so that was a key finding for us and i hope his helper for others as well. in other news this year as we look back, "stop bullying: speak up" is being adopted internationally. we have planned marches in chile and argentina later this year and working with colleagues in canada asia and europe on launches over the next two years. bullying is as the researchers and in this room know better than i is the opal problem and we hope that "stop bullying: speak up" can be part of a global solution. as with the at counsel facebook
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has been a tremendously helpful partner for us. along with each of our international launches and we talked about a million likes and we continue to find responsible ways to work with facebook to meet parents, community members and students need. let's see if this video place. a tape introduction from president obama, our first-ever documentary called speak up and it features him talking about being bullied, being a bully and how they did and did not speak up when they saw bullying happening. i hope i will be able to show you a clip now but if i am not it is on the "stop bullying: speak up" web site. all the educational rights have been cleared and it's available for free download on the site and i believe on itunes as a free download and you can also see it on youtube. is there

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